• Wed
    25
    Jan
    2012
    Wed
    29
    Feb
    2012
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    This seminar series explores the role the media play as political actors in developing countries and fragile states. It gathers scholars from a variety of disciplines to examine how old and new media are used to support different political agenda: from foreign countries trying to win the hearts and minds of a local population to local governments aiming at increasing their ability to communicate with, but also exercise control over, their citizens. Particular attention will be paid to understanding how flows of information can be mapped in contexts characterized by an increasing media density, resulting from the liberalization of the airwaves, the diffusion of mobile phones and new media, and the persistence of traditional modes of communication.

    The seminar series is part of a year-long programme of events organized by the Centre of Governance and Human Rights (CGHR) at the University of Cambridge, the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Politics (PCMLP), Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, at the University of Oxford and the Justice and Security Research Programme (JSRP) at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

    Week 2 - Wed 25 January THE USE OF ICTS FOR POLITICAL MOBILIZATION AND PARTICIPATION IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
    ROUND TABLE: Dr Sharath Srinivasan, Dr Florence Brisset-Foucault, University of Cambridge, Dr Iginio Gagliardone, University of Oxford

    Week 3 - Wed 1 February THE EPARTICIPATION ECOLOGY OF KENYA
    Dr Vincenzo Cavallo, Cultural Video Foundation, Nairobi

    Week 4 - Wed 8 February THE CONDITIONS OF STRATEGIC NARRATIVE EFFECTIVENESS: INFRASTRUCTURE, INTENTION, EXPERIENCE
    Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Royal Holloway, University of London

    Week 5 - Wed 15 February CHINA'S INTERNATIONAL OUTREACH: SOFT POWER AND THE SOFT USE OF POWER
    Professor Gary Rawnsley, University of Leeds

    Week 6 - Wed 22 February BROADCASTING THE STATE: TRIBE, CITIZENSHIP AND THE POLITICS OF RADIO DRAMA IN AFGHANISTAN
    Professor Marie Gillespie, Open University

    Week 7 - Wed 29 February AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE USE OF THE MEDIA FOR POLITICAL MOBILIZATION
    Dr John Postill, Sheffield Hallam University

    ~ All are welcome, please email iginio.gagliardone@csls.ox.ac.uk for further information ~

    **If you missed this series, we have made the videos available online in the MULTIMEDIA section of this website.

  • Wed
    01
    Feb
    2012
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    The post-election dispute that erupted in Kenya in 2007/2008 caused not only clashes followed by widespread violence and forced internal migrations but also the beginning of a new technological era for the Kenyan tech community and the Kenyan media activist scene. This talk will explore how a set of new analytical tools can be employed to study how new technologies can be used to gain power by different types of activists. Dr Vincenzo Cavallo will reflect in particular on the concept of Informational Multitude and on the model he developed during his research in Kenya, the eParticipation Ecologies, discussing possible applications for future research projects and political actions.

    Speaker: Dr Vincenzo Cavallo (Cultural Video Foundation, Nairobi) is a visual artist, academic and a media activist. Since 2003 he has been producing video documentaries and developed participation platforms for independent media companies, national and international broadcasters, cultural institutions, no profit organizations and social movements. In 2009 he developed www.urbanmirror.org, a participatory platform using the Ushahidi software to map public space and public art in Nairobi.

    The event is part of the seminar series “MEDIA AND GOVERNANCE IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: NETWORKS OF POWER AND STRATEGIC NARRATIVES” organized by the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP). For more information, please contact Iginio.gagliardone@csls.ox.ac.uk

    **If you missed the seminar, we have made the video of the event available online in the MULTIMEDIA section of this website.

  • Wed
    08
    Feb
    2012
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    A decade of attempts by the US and UK to “win hearts and minds” has thrown up a series of conceptual and practical difficulties for leaders seeking to wield strategic narratives, for analysts charged with demonstrating their effectiveness, and for scholars trying to explain how communication and international relations intersect. Strategic narratives are a means for political actors to construct a shared meaning of international politics to shape the behaviour of domestic and international actors. They are critical to explaining change in the international system. This paper examines three challenges: (i) Changing information infrastructures alter how shared meanings are constructed; (ii) Many narratives seem to escape the intentions of their original authors; and (iii) Target audiences may ‘buy in’ to a major power’s narrative but still not experience international politics as that major power hoped. Does this mean that measurable effects are forever disappearing over the horizon?

    Speaker: Ben O’Loughlin is Professor of International Relations and Co-Director of the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London. He co-edits the Sage journal Media, War & Conflict. His books include Radicalisation and Media: Terrorism and Connectivity in the New Media Ecology (2011), War and Media: The Emergence of Diffused War (2010) and Television and Terror: Conflicting Times and the Crisis of News Discourse (2007/09). His projects on media and security have been funded by the ESRC, CPNI and the Technology Strategy Board.

    **If you missed the seminar, we have made the video of the event available online in the MULTIMEDIA section of this website.

  • Wed
    15
    Feb
    2012
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    China has boarded the soft power bandwagon with an enthusiasm rarely witnessed elsewhere: Confucius Institutes, promotional videos in New York’s Times Square, CCTV 9, pandas arriving at Edinburgh Zoo. China’s soft power strategy explores new and innovative techniques of attracting global attention, while also embracing History and traditional culture as themes that can resonate with international audiences.

    However, how does this international outreach strategy sit with soft power theory which highlights the importance of projecting values, ideals and principles? Is the Chinese approach to soft power modelled on identifiably ‘western’ practices, or does it demonstrate distinct Chinese understandings of soft power? The research presented in this seminar is an attempt to begin the process of de-Westernising soft power and to understand the disjuncture between China’s aspirations and the external perceptions of its actions. The presentation will critique China’s current international outreach strategy and question the emphasis on cultural approaches to soft power. Finally it will suggest that soft power cannot be a panacea for problems in the hard power domain.

    Speaker: Gary Rawnsley is Professor of International Communications at the University of Leeds. He is the co-editor of The Routledge Handbook of Chinese Media (forthcoming), Global Chinese Cinema: The Culture and Politics of Hero (2010) and Political Communications in Greater China (2003). He is the author of many books and articles on international communications with particular interest in Taiwan. His present research is a study of Taiwan’s soft power and public diplomacy.

  • Tue
    21
    Feb
    2012
    Thu
    23
    Feb
    2012
    Doha, Qatar

    From February 21st-23rd, the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP) is organizing the Middle East Regional Rounds of the Price Media Law Moot Court Competition in Doha, Qatar together with Qatar University’s College of Law, the Al Jazeera Media Training and Development Centre and the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication. The Finals will be broadcast live on Aljazeera Mubasher, Aljazeera’s 24 hour news channel from 8.30am AST (+3GMT): http://mubasher.aljazeera.net/

    After the Finals on February 23rd, a seminar will be held on Media Policy After the Arab Spring that will bring together leading academics and lawyers from the region for an intriguing discussion about the politics and challenges of media reform in the context of complex transitions.  Participants will include, among others, Judge Andras Sajo of the European Court of Human Rights and Professor at Central European University, Osama Abu-Deways who is Head of Al Jazeera’s Legal Affairs Department, and Professor Hussein Amin of the American University in Cairo.

    This event is open to all and will be held at the Al Jazeera Media Development and Training Centre in Doha.  For more information or to register, please contact Deeksha Sharma: deeksha.sharma@exeter.ox.ac.uk

  • Wed
    22
    Feb
    2012
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    How does the format of ‘The Archers’, BBC Radio 4’s longest running radio soap opera, travel and translate across linguistic and cultural boundaries and why? Why has the Afghan Archers been so popular over nearly two decades? Can such radio soap operas, designed to promote development, change the social worlds or behaviour of their audiences? How are the narratives understood and shaped by Afghan radio audiences? What are the challenges facing producers and dramatists who are tasked with creating strategic development narratives as well as entertaining dramas?

    This seminar will address questions that lie at the heart of a transformation in broadcasting that has accelerated over recent decades, namely, the blending of entertainment with education (edu-tainment) in pursuit, ostensibly, of specific development outcomes such as improved nutrition, conflict reduction or greater gender equity. The BBC World Service Trust, the international charity of the BBC World Service, has been at the forefront of these developments over the last two decades. However, their work in the field of drama for development has received little sustained academic scrutiny or critical appraisal from scholars or practitioners.

    This presentation is based on a longitudinal ethnographic research by and with Andrew Skuse on New Home, New Life – a radio soap produced by the BBC and the Afghan Education Project. It presents a conjunctural analysis of representations of the state, tribe and citizenship in the radio serial in three distinctly different political moments in recent Afghan political history: Mujahideen rule (1989.–1996), the Taliban era (1997.–2001) and the post-Taliban democratic period of US/NATO influence (2002-2010). The seminar will explore how not just development goals travel and translate via the Afghan Archers. Modern, neo-liberal state practices and institutional arrangements have become part of the textual fabric of New Home New Life and both traditional tribal and non-tribal rural audiences in Afghanistan interpret these stories in their everyday lives, often in unpredictable ways. Edu-tainment soaps can be seen to function as a form of ‘soft power’ and a conveyor of western liberal values but they do not always have the effects intended by donors, development workers and dramatists.

    Speaker: Marie Gillespie is Professor of Sociology at The Open University and Co-Director of the Centre for Research on Socio-Cultural Change. Andrew Skuse is Professor of Anthropology at Adelaide University. Andrew undertook primary research on New Home New Life. He worked with Marie from 2006-11 on collaborative research with BBC World Service Trust and they co-edited a volume, with Gerry Power, entitled Dramas for Development:: Cultural Translation and Social Change published by Sage India. For more details of project see: http://www8.open.ac.uk/researchprojects/diasporas/

  • Thu
    23
    Feb
    2012
    Doha, Qatar

    Organized by the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP), Qatar University's College of Law, the Aljazeera Media Training and Development Centre and  the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania        

    This dialogue brings together a group of top scholars, lawyers and regulators from the region and international community for an intriguing discussion about the politics and challenges of media reform in the context of complex transitions.  What types of media systems are new governments trying to create? What comparative lessons can be drawn and how should national policymakers think about and negotiate international and regional norms? International broadcasters such as Aljazeera had an instrumental role in providing critical information during revolutions in the region. How are these international broadcasters reflecting, amplifying or even encouraging demands for a particular direction of media reform?
     
    Welcoming and Opening Remarks

    Keynote Address:
    Professor Andras Sajo
    “Comparative Perspectives on the Protection of Journalist Sources”

    Panel One: Challenges and Opportunities in Media Policymaking and the Arab Spring
    This session explores how national and regional norms related to media freedom and access to information emerged in the Middle East and how they relate to international standards. It brings together data and experiences from various Arab countries to discuss how these norms are established and how they are enforced.

    Professor Hussein Amin
    “The Future of the Egyptian Broadcast Industry and the Need for a Regulator”

    William Youmans
    “Patterns in Violations of Expression and Journalism: Before and After the 2011 Arab Uprisings”

    Chair: Osama Abu-Dehays, Chief Legal Officer, AlJazeera Network

    Panel Two: Comparative Perspectives on Media Regulation and Standards
    Examines how governments seek to regulate producers and diffusers of information in the age of new media with a particular focus in the context of the Arab Spring.

    Professor Khawar Qureshi QC
    "The Challenges for Free Media in the Era of 24 hour real-time Transmission in the aftermath of the Arab Spring"

    Justice Barbara Dohmann
    "What are the Media for? Challenges for Regulation"

    Chair: Christopher Campbell-Holt, Acting Registrar, Qatar International Court and Dispute Resolution Centre

  • Fri
    24
    Feb
    2012
    Seminar Room B, Manor Road Building

    This seminar will bring together two of China’s leading academics to discuss contemporary challenges in media policy making.

    ZHUGE Weidong: The Reform Process and Policies in Chinese Media Industries
    China’s media sector has been experiencing tremendous growth in recent years. It has been reformed to apply company management to the originally non-profit media organizations. The process of such a reform can be divided into three phases, namely, the initial marketization, the establishment of media groups and systemic reform. This presentation will give a general introduction to the background, objectives, timetable as well as the problems emerging along the way of China’s media system reform.

    GONG Wenxiang: Media and the Beijing Olympics: Changes in the Age of New Media
    The coverage of the 2008 Beijing Olympics as typical “Media Events” was intended to present the positive image of China to the world. However, at the same time there was an explosion of new media, namely the internet, blogs, cell-phones, etc. The relationship between the traditional media events and the new media events can be cooperation, penetration, or even direct confrontation. In the era of New Media it is not easy for the official media to monopolize all the resources and channels of expression any more. The netizens found their own way of expression, their opinion leaders, and even their own agenda. It is a  new power for participation, and scholars view this as the dawn of an “E-Democracy” in China.

    Zhuge Weidong  and Gong Wenxiang are currently visiting academics at the Programme of Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP). Professor Zhuge is at the Department of Journalism and Communication at the Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences. His research interests include media policy, media management, and comparative media system studies. Professor Wenxiang is Director of the Institute of Communication and Culture at Beijing University. He works on comparative culture and communication studies, persuasion in communication, Chinese cultural aspects of communication and access to information.

    Wine and nibbles will be served afterwards.

  • Wed
    29
    Feb
    2012
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    A great deal has been written about the role of new media in recent episodes of social unrest in the Middle East, Europe, North America and other regions. However, missing from most discussions is a careful consideration of the processual dimensions of these struggles. Instead we are often given synoptic accounts that fail to take into account the unique constellations of media actors, technologies and arenas that will obtain at different stages of a conflict. In this paper I find inspiration in the Manchester School of Anthropology’s emphasis on the ‘processual form’ of a political conflict (Postill 2011). Drawing from a year’s anthropological fieldwork in Barcelona (Spain), I reconstruct the shifting mediascape of Spain’s 15-M or indignados movement, from its roots in an online mobilisation against an anti-digital piracy bill through its square occupation phase to more recent events, including its seminal influence on the global Occupy movement. I argue that markedly distinct mediascapes did indeed shape - and were in turn shaped - by a heterogeneous assortment of political actors at different phases of the conflict, including a strange webfellowship of (micro)bloggers, hackers, technopreneurs, lawyers and students during the preparatory stages of the 15 May marches. It is within such transient configurations, I propose, that we can best assess the significance of different media technologies to the birth, growth and eventual demise of a protest movement. I end by briefly considering the potential applicability of this processual approach to other social unrest case studies.

    Speaker: John Postill is an anthropologist who specialises in media and internet studies. He has a PhD in anthropology from University College London (UCL) and is senior lecturer in media at Sheffield Hallam University. He has conducted fieldwork in Malaysia and Spain and is the author of Media and Nation Building (2006) and Localizing the Internet (2011) and the co-editor of Theorising Media and Practice (2010). Currently he is writing a book about social media and protest, with special reference to Spain's indignados movement.

    The event is part of the seminar series “MEDIA AND GOVERNANCE IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: NETWORKS OF POWER AND STRATEGIC NARRATIVES”. For more information, contact Iginio.gagliardone@csls.ox.ac.uk

  • Tue
    06
    Mar
    2012
    African Studies Centre

    Speaker: Dr Iginio Gagliardone

    After witnessing the critical role new Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) played in supporting political change in Northern Africa at the beginning of 2011, expectations have grown that in Sub-Saharan Africa authoritarian or ‘semi-authoritarian’ regimes may also be challenged by emerging uses of ICTs. However, there have been little signs that long-standing leaders in countries like Zimbabwe, Ethiopia, or Uganda may be ousted from power by a popular uprising supported by and coordinated through the use of new technologies. What are the reasons for this apparent absence of impact? How much of the lack of technologically mediated mobilizations for greater rights and political freedoms depends simply on the limited diffusion of ICTs such as the Internet? How much depends instead on local specific political patterns and dynamics? And, in the absence of revolutionary outcomes, are ICTs affecting and possibly transforming the nature of political mobilization and participation in more subtle ways? By analysing the case of Ethiopia and comparing the mobilization that followed the controversial and contested elections of 2005 with the events that led to regime changes in Tunisia and Ethiopia in 2011, this paper seeks answers to these questions and proposes an approach that captures the broader relationship between media and politics.

  • Wed
    21
    Mar
    2012
    Sat
    24
    Mar
    2012
    Oxford, UK

    From March 21st-24th, PCMLP will be organizing the the international oral rounds of the Price Media Law Moot Court Competition.

    The International Rounds in Oxford are the cornerstone of the Price Media Law Moot Court Programme and are now in their fifth year. The competition expands and stimulates an interest in Media Law and Policy among students, who will develop expertise in arguing a case before an international bench of judges from different legal systems and backgrounds.

    The International Rounds of the Price Moot Court Competition are known for their wide range of students and judges attending the competition from all over the world including teams from China, Ukraine, Nigeria, Kenya, India, Singapore, Jordan, Pakistan, Georgia, and Korea. In some cases, the students, coaches and judges deal with issues that are rarely debated or discussed in their own countries.

    The competition consistently attracts some of the most prominent figures in the field of media law and over 65 individuals will be coming to serve as judges this year.

    Participants in the International rounds held in Oxford operate in a world where a Universal Court of Human Rights has been established to ensure the citizens of the United Nations are enjoying the rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Moreover a Chamber of the Universal Court of Human Rights has been established in order to deal with issues specifically addressing cases concerning Freedom of Expression as set out in Article 19 of the UDHR and when freedom of expression collides with other fundamental rights in the Declaration. The Chamber is known as the “Universal Freedom of Expression Court”. Participants in the regional moot courts, or qualifying rounds, are encouraged to draw on domestic law when formulating their arguments.

    The Finals will be held from 12-2pm at Rhodes House and all are welcome to attend.  For further information, please see the Price Moot Court website.

  • Tue
    01
    May
    2012
    Wed
    02
    May
    2012
    Washington, DC, USA

    Iginio Gagliardone is presenting his ongoing research on ICTs and political mobilization at the conference “The New African Democracy: Information Technology and Political Participation”, organized by the African Studies Program at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

    The meeting brings together experts and policymakers to discuss challenges and opportunities for African politics in the digital age.

    The conference addresses two critical questions
    (i) How has ICT advanced democratic participation, government accountability, and state-society relations in Africa?
    (ii) How can policy better support connectivity and the use of ICT for democratic political participation and government accountability and transparency in the region?

    You can read more about the conference here: http://www.sais-jhu.edu/academics/regional-studies/africa/events/techconference.htm

    The conference is broadcast live at: http://www.sais-jhu.edu/pressroom/live.html

  • Sat
    26
    May
    2012
    Xianyang, China

    In the context of the EU project to support media law and regulation reform in China in which PCMLP participates, a discussion forum will be organized in Xianyang (Shaanxi Province, China) on 26 May, organized with Peking University's Centre for Reform Theory and Practice and the Great Britain China Centre. This workshop is aimed to provide input to professionals and policymakers concerning the role of media organizations and sector associations in media regulation, with a particular emphasis on self-regulation. As part of this forum, PCMLP researcher Rogier Creemers will provide background on principles of media self-regulation in Europe, and two other experts from the PCMLP network will present topics related to particular phenomena of self-regulation in practice.

  • Wed
    13
    Jun
    2012
    St Antony's College

    Panel 1: 14.00 – 15.45
    Chair: Dr. Nic Cheeseman, African Studies Centre, University of Oxford

    1. Changing discourses on democracy
    Professor Kjetil Tronvoll, International Law and Policy Institute, Oslo

    2. The Ethiopian politics machine: a view from below
    Marco di Nunzio, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Oxford
     
    3. The ‘democratic developmental state’: a product of 2005?
    Dr. Lovise Aalen, Chr. Michelsen Institute, Bergen

    4. EPRDF’s Ethiopia: changes and continuities
    Professor Christopher Clapham, Centre for African Studies, University of Cambridge

    15.45 – 16.00 Coffee Break

    Panel 2: 16.00 – 17.30
    Chair: Jason Mosley, Africa Programme, Chatham House

    1. Media and politics after 2005
    Dr. Nicole Stremlau, Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP), University of Oxford

    2. A Miscarriage of the paradigm shift: churches and the Ethiopian ‘Election 2005’
    Merid Desta, Oxford Centre for Mission Studies, University of Oxford

    3. New media: building or challenging the state?
    Dr. Iginio Gagliardone, Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP), University of Oxford

  • Fri
    15
    Jun
    2012
    Sat
    16
    Jun
    2012
    Seminar Room A, Manor Road Building

    China’s media landscape has undergone tremendous changes over the last few years. Technological innovation and the explosion of Internet use have changed the landscape for the dissemination of entertainment and information. Provincial television channels have boomed. Privatization and foreign investment and influence have become important questions for consideration. The cultural industries have become a priority area for further economic development. At the international level, media trade is one of the most prominent issues between China and the United States. Electronic media have also become a channel for bottom-up political activity: increasingly microblogs are used to bring specific incidents into the public sphere, or for satirical expressions. However, so far, questions of how these matters are governed have not yet been studied in depth. This conference aims to identify and discuss relevant questions of emerging issues in Chinese media law and policy.

    *Friday 15 June*

    09.15: Registration

    09.30 Welcome and Participant Introductions

    09.45 Workshop Overview (Dr Rogier Creemers, PCMLP)

    10.00-11.30: The Structure of Chinese Media Governance

    These two sessions explore how the Chinese media are organized. Topics to be addressed include the development of content regulation in China, the structure of the media control regime and the theoretical background of media governance.

    The Development of the Media Industry and the Reform On Content Regulation: The Case of China (Professor Li Danlin, Communication University of China)

    An Historical Overview of Chinese Departments and Ministries Engaged in Chinese Internet Management (Mr Gianluigi Negro, USI Lugano)

    For Whom Do You Speak? Looking at Chinese Media Regulation in a Luhmanian Way (Mr Ge Xing, University of Tokyo)

    Chair: Dr Damian Tambini (London School of Economics)

    11.30-11.45 Coffee break

    11.45-13.00 The Structure of Chinese Media Governance, part II

    Chinese Media Regulation and Entrepreneurship: The View From Social Media (Mr Alex Mou, Zuosa.com)

    Chinese Media Governance in a Comparative Perspective (Professor Monroe Price, University of Pennsylvania)

    Chair: Dr Anna Boermel (King’s College London)

    13.00-14.00: Lunch

    14.00-15.30: Defamation

    The expansion of China’s online population has fundamentally changed the public sphere. As a consequence, the number of disputes between private parties concerning expressions on social media has risen sharply. This session provides insight into different aspects of defamation cases, and aims to theorize the emerging legal doctrines in this field.

    Free Speech and Defamation on the Chinese Internet:
    A Case Study of the Human Flesh Search Engine (Mr Shen Weiwei, University of Pennsylvania)

    The Current Situation, Problems and Countermeasures of Defamation Law in China (Dr Zheng Wenming, Beijing Capital University of Economics and Business)

    Exploring the Particularities and Challenges of Media Tort in China: An Empirical Study on 800 Legal Cases (Mr Zhu Li, Wentian Law Firm, Beijing)

    Chair: Dr Perry Keller (King’s College London)

    15.30-15.45: Coffee Break

    15.45- 17.15: Press Regulation

    The traditional press remains an important channel for public communication. Traditionally, it was considered to be the mouthpiece of the Party, but as China’s society and political structure has grown more complex, fragmentation has rendered this characterization obsolete. Nonetheless, the Party-State aims to adapt its control over journalism to better suit changed circumstances. This session explores the measures that are being taken, for which purposes and what their impact is.

    Regulating Reporters: A Three-Tiered Approach (Professor Doreen Weisenhaus, University of Hong Kong, via Skype)

    The Media's Watchdog Role in China: the State's Promotion and Journalists' Interpretation (Ms Maria Repnikova, University of Oxford)

    Logic and Dynamics of Gradual Reform on China's Press Regulation: A Reflection on Enterprise Transformation and Delisting Mechanism (Professor Han Xiaoning, Renmin University of China)

    Chair: Mr Richard Danbury (University of Oxford)

    17.30-18.30: Drinks Reception (PCMLP)

    *Saturday 16 June*

    09.30-11.00: Telecommunications and Economic Regulation

    Following technological development, media require an increasingly complex technological support structure. Questions of network access, telecommunications and network integration are crucial as a framework for the content industries to develop. This session addresses some of these questions, in particular in relation to industrial policy, innovation and their effect on media markets.

    The Chinese Interpretation of Industrial Policy in Telecommunications and Media Markets (Dr Thomas Hart, Information Society Strategy and Policy, Beijing, via Skype)

    The Dragon Awakes: China's Telecoms, Internet, New Media, and Next Generation Networks (Professor Rohan Kariyawasam and Ms. Chen Zhang, University of Cardiff)

    Getting it Both Ways: Media Regulation in China in the Wake of Communications Convergence (Dr Zhongdong Niu, Edinburgh Napier University)

    Chair: Dr Nicole Stremlau (PCMLP)

    11.00-11.15: Coffee Break

    11.15-12.45: The Market and the Media

    Chinese media have become increasingly marketized, as they have emerged as an important locus of economic activity, as well as fulfilling a political role. However, commercial interests often clash with political and social objectives. This session looks at the regulation of advertising as an example of this, as well as the burgeoning animation sector. Furthermore, it explores the links between copyright and media regulation.

    How do the Chinese Copyright Law and Regulations Affect the Business Activities of the Media Industry? (Mr Wan Yong, Shanghai Jiaotong University)

    Blindness and Myopia Caused by Self-Interest: Government Failure in Chinese Advertising Regulation (Ms Li Mingwei, Shenzhen University)

    The Interplay Between Regulation and the Market in China’s Animation Industry (Dr Chwen Chwen Chen, Vincenzo De Masi, USI Lugano)

    Chair: Dr Rogier Creemers (PCMLP)

    12.45-13.15: Concluding Remarks

    13.15-14.15: Lunch

    Participation in this conference is free of charge, but space is limited so participants are kindly requested to register with Ms. Louise Scott (louise.scott@csls.ox.ac.uk). A sandwich lunch will be provided on both days.

  • Mon
    18
    Jun
    2012
    Fri
    29
    Jun
    2012
    Oxford, UK

    The Programme for Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford and the Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania are pleased to host the 14th annual Annenberg-Oxford Media Policy Summer Institute, to be held from Monday, June 18 to Friday, June 29, 2012 at the University of Oxford.

    The annual summer institute brings together young scholars and regulators to discuss important recent trends in technology, international politics and development and its influence on media policy. Participants come from around the world; countries represented at previous summer institute include Thailand, Kenya, China, Brazil, Egypt, Nigeria, Jordan, Italy and Bosnia, among others.

    This year the summer institute seeks, as part of the cohort, researchers and academics (PhD candidates and early career academics, for example), who will come with a research project related to the general subject of the seminar. Research generally related to the work of the Center for Global Communication Studies and the Programme for Comparative Media Law and Policy is especially welcome, and some participants will be asked to present their research.

    The seminars this year will focus on several key areas, including media governance in India and China and strategic communication in conflict and post-conflict and transitional environments, particularly in the Middle East and Africa. At the same time, the successful curriculum that has been the foundation of the program over the years will continue, with sessions covering global media policy issues such as media and economic/social development, freedom of information, internet regulation and convergence. Part of the course will be devoted to new developments in comparative approaches to regulation, looking at Ofcom in the UK and other agencies, including examples from the Middle East, Africa and Asia.

    The seminar brings together a wide range of participants from around the globe and provides them with an environment in which significant policy issues are seriously discussed. The richness of the experience comes from exposure to a variety of speakers and from the discussions among participants themselves.

  • Mon
    29
    Oct
    2012
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    Dr Rogier Creemers, PCMLP Project Officer, will speak about his current research on media law in China.

  • Fri
    09
    Nov
    2012
    St Antony's College

    In the past few years Africa has attracted unprecedented interest from international media players. In January 2012 China Central Television (CCTV) launched its new platform, CCTV Africa, providing information on Africa to Chinese, African and global audiences. Al Jazeera, as a relatively new player on the continent, has become increasingly popular and is exploring the possibility to launch of a new channel in Kiswahili, while actors which have broadcasted to Africa for a long time, such as the BBC, are developing a new strategy for the continent. This conference explores these transformations together with the very actors that are transforming old and new media on the African continent.

    Registration and Welcome:  Iginio Gagliardone,  University of Oxford
     
    Panel 1: 9.00-11.00 The New Face of International Broadcasting in Africa

    Song Jianing, Bureau Chief, CCTV Africa
    Mohamed Adow, Director, Al-Jazeera Kiswahili
    Mary Harper, Africa Editor, BBC
    Nicole Stremlau, University of Oxford
(Chair)

    Panel 2: 11.30-13.00 Reflecting on the Shift: Implications for Africa and Beyond

    Martyn Davies, CEO Frontier Advisory Africa
    Yushan Wu, South African Institute of International Affairs
    Winston Mano, University of Westminster
    Chris Alden, London School of Economics (Chair)

    Lunch in Hall: 13.00-14.00

    Panel 3: 14.00-16.00 New Media and New Technologies

    Wang Chaowen, General Director, Xinhua Africa Bureau
    Yawei Liu, Director, China Programme, The Carter Center
    Timothy Garton Ash, University of Oxford
    Martin Plaut, BBC (Chair)

    Early bird registration is £20 (£15 students) before 4 November. £30 thereafter. It includes lunch in hall. Register at http://oucan.politics.ox.ac.uk. Please contact oucan@politics.ox.ac.uk with any queries.

  • Mon
    19
    Nov
    2012
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    Dr Iginio Gagliardone, British Academy Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, will speak about his current research on the growing role of China in Africa's media.

  • Fri
    23
    Nov
    2012
    Mon
    26
    Nov
    2012
    Delhi, India

    The Price Media Law Moot Court - South Asia Regional Rounds will be held in collaboration with the Centre for Media Governance, NLU Delhi in Delhi, India from 23-26 November 2012. As part of the expansion of the Price Moot Court Programme in South Asia, this year's competition will see teams from the region traveling to Delhi for the South Asia Round. Victory for NALSAR University of Law, Hyderbad in the International Round of the Competition in March 2012 was a testament to the quality of mooting in India and we are sure that the competition for places in the International Rounds will intensify this year. The extremely high quality of judging has become a feature of the South Asia Regional Rounds and this year's competition will see a fantastic line-up of judges as well. For more information please see: http://pricemootcourt.socleg.ox.ac.uk/competitions/india/2012-13.

  • Wed
    28
    Nov
    2012
    Seminar Room B, Manor Road Building

    After the 18th Party Congress, many questions remain as to the path that China will take in the next five years, and how the new leadership will weigh on policy. One of the key bellwether areas to gauge reform will be media and the Internet. The pressure for China to open up the public space is growing, and open communication is increasingly necessary to further enhance economic performance. However, this will conflict with the instinctive climate of opacity fostered by the CCP. We will discuss the potential evolution of media policy, as well as current debates and trends with Professor Li Danlin (Communications University of China) and Ge Chen (University of Göttingen).

  • Fri
    14
    Dec
    2012
    Sun
    16
    Dec
    2012
    Belgrade, Serbia

    The Price Media Law Moot Court - South East Europe Regional Rounds will be held in Belgrade in collaboration with the University of Belgrade, Faculty of Law from 14-16 December 2012. A seminar on current issues in media policy in the region will be held along side the moot. For further information please visit: http://pricemootcourt.socleg.ox.ac.uk/competitions/see/2012-13

  • Thu
    24
    Jan
    2013
    Sun
    27
    Jan
    2013
    New York, USA

    The inaugural Americas Regional Rounds of the Price Moot Court Competition will be taking place from 24 - 27 January 2013 in New York.  The event is being organised in collaboration with the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law and the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania.

    Schools from Canada, the United States, Latin America, and the Caribbean will be competing in this exciting event, which will serve as a regional forum for dialogue and debate on media law and policy issues of profound significance.

    For more information, please see our website: http://pricemootcourt.socleg.ox.ac.uk/competitions/americas/2012-13

  • Wed
    30
    Jan
    2013
    Oxford Internet Institute

    Robin Mansell discusses dominant approaches by intergovernmental agencies to information society policy and the prospects for introducing critical perspectives that acknowledge the power relations which inform information society strategies and actions.

    Speaker: Professor Robin Mansell, London School of Economics

    Robin Mansell is Professor of New Media and the Internet at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her research focuses on how and why people communicate with each other, especially when their relationships are mediated by the use of information and communication technologies. She has a special interest in the relationships between institutional and micro-level change and in technological innovation, inequality and social justice. Her current research focuses on the social, political and economic influences of media and communication policy and regulation, with a special interest in governance arrangements for new media and the Internet. Topics central to her interest include: social and organizational transformation and new technologies; information and communication technology policy, regulation and governance; knowledge networks and innovation systems; and information and communication technologies and development.

  • Wed
    30
    Jan
    2013
    Wed
    27
    Feb
    2013
    Oxford Internet Institute

    The seminar series gathers leading scholars and practitioners to reflect on the influence of new communication technologies on development processes. The seminars will focus on the dramatic changes in citizens’ ability to coordinate and mobilize for political action, on global migration and its relation to digital media, and on how international and national actors are seeking to shape the applications of technology and communication.

  • Wed
    06
    Feb
    2013
    Oxford Internet Institute

    This seminar will explore technology and regulation in the Somali territories of the Horn of Africa. Despite weak or non-existent government institutions, innovation has flourished with local solutions to local challenges. Money transfer companies have been leading the expansion and investments in ICT development. Mobile banking, inexpensive internet connection, and dozens of media outlets are an unexpected reality in this war-torn region. How are ICTs regulated and the role of the private sector in ICT development, will be explored.

    Speaker: Mr Abdirashid Duale, CEO of Dahabshiil

    Mr Abdirashid Duale is a British-Somali entrepreneur, philanthropist, and the CEO of the multinational enterprise, Dahabshiil. In September 2012 he was cited by the Africa Report to be among the "50 most influential Africans". Abdirashid joined his father in the business prior to the outbreak of civil strife in Somalia in 1988, when they were forced to flee the country and make a fresh start. With limited resources and a strong network of contacts they rebuilt their business into one of the largest international money transfer companies in Africa. Abdirashid has worked on expanding Dahabshiil's reach into new markets and today Dahabshiil employs more than 2,000 people worldwide and has branches in 144 countries spread across five continents.

  • Wed
    13
    Feb
    2013
    Oxford Internet Institute

    In early March 2012 the Kony 2012 viral video took the world by storm. Attracting over 70 million views in less than a week from its release it was equally criticized and admired as an example of the power of social media. In this talk I will assess the optimism surrounding the opportunities that social media offer for humanitarian action. Drawing on the analysis of the phenomenally popular and controversial Kony 2012 campaign I observe that the architectures of social networking sites orientate action at a communitarian level which heightens their post-humanitarian style (Chouliaraki, 2012). However, an emerging new genre of reporting and commenting which I term “polymedia events” can potentially extend beyond the limitations of SNS communication by opening up the space for reflexivity and dialogical imagination.

    Speaker: Dr Mirca Madianou, University of Leicester

    Mirca Madianou is Senior Lecturer in Media and Communication at the University of Leicester. Her research examines the role of new communication technologies in the context of migration and transnational families in particular. She is the author of two books and several journal articles on new media and long distance relationships; migration and transnationalsm; media and nationalism; audiences (particularly the audiences for news media); and the role of emotions in mediated communication. Her research has been funded by the ESRC, ESF, the Mellon Foundation and CRASSH, Cambridge.

  • Mon
    18
    Feb
    2013
    Thu
    21
    Feb
    2013
    Doha, Qatar

    The Price Media Law Moot Court - Middle East Regional Rounds is organized by PCMLP and the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication as part of a larger effort to to strengthen media law and policy research, teaching, and practice in Qatar and the Middle East. Building on the strengths of the inaugural competition in February 2012, the second round will take place in Doha 18-21 February 2013. The competition will be held at Al Jazeera. Teams that are successful in these regional rounds will qualify to go on to participate in the 2013 International Rounds in Oxford.

    We are grateful for the support of our partners, Qatar University, Annenberg School for Communication and AlJazeera Media Training & Development Center.

    For more information, please see: http://pricemootcourt.socleg.ox.ac.uk/competitions/middle-east/2012-13

  • Wed
    20
    Feb
    2013
    Oxford Internet Institute

    Drawing on case study material, the paper focuses on ways in which definitions of ‘media’ and other technical objects act to promote or prevent ‘connection’. In a development context, the ways in which new media objects such as ICTs are defined in relation to other objects, people and institutions map out new figurations of power and connection, or new ‘technological zones’ (Barry), that revalue and recombine political agency. Consideration of the politics of technology needs to be moved away from seeing ICTs as neutral tools to be enabled or as problematic interventions to be contained; rather, we need to be able to make visible and negotiable the possible communicative assemblages that might be produced.

    Speaker: Dr Don Slater, London School of Economics

    Don Slater is a Reader in Sociology at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Don Slater's Internet research has focused on ethnographic approaches to the new media, and has so far included an ethnography of Internet use in Trinidad - The Internet: An Ethnographic Approach, with Prof Daniel Miller (Berg: 2000); and a study of on-line pornography traders. He conducted an ethnography of community radio and internet in rural Sri Lanka (with Peter Lewis, LSE, and Jo Tacchi, QUT, under the auspices of UNESCO and DfID), which has been followed by a UNESCO programme of ethnographic action research with nine ICT projects in South Asia, and a two-year DfID-funded programme of comparative ethnographies of new media in India, Ghana, South Africa and Jamaica (with Daniel Miller, Jo Tacchi and Andrew Skuse).

  • Wed
    27
    Feb
    2013
    Oxford Internet Institute

    The discipline of ICT4D has never appeared more, or less, relevant. On the one hand, technology has become unprecedentedly pervasive, plastic, mobile, and cheap; increasingly based on open standards, emerging, platform-based architectures beckon towards an empowered era of development hubs, mashups, and commercial and social enterprise that increasingly offer those in emerging economies an independent, 'continuous beta' of thought and activity. On the other, it might be said that such positive developments challenge those working in ICT4D, and even 'development' itself, to engage in a new way with people who are increasingly 'doing it for themselves'. In this talk, I will try to address some of the opportunities and contradictions presented by this tension, and consider some emerging ways in which ICT4D researchers may contribute to the field.

    Speaker: Dr Mark Thompson, University of Cambridge

    Mark Thompson is Senior Lecturer in Information Systems at the University of Cambridge. He has sixteen years of information systems and change management consultancy experience, including four years with Andersen Consulting (Accenture). He is currently a Director of Methods Consulting, a UK top 20 business and IS consultancy. He is also a Main Board Member of Intellect, the UK's leading technology trade association. In 2007-2008 Mark was a senior adviser to the UK Shadow Cabinet under George Osborne, for whom he delivered an influential report proposing widespread adoption of open standards in government IT that has since become policy. Mark was credited by Cabinet Office Minister Francis Maude as having laid the foundation for the government's current procurement strategy and has subsequently authored, co-authored, or significantly influenced a series of a series of white papers, policy documents, and a parliamentary committee Expert Report. Such documents include think-tank document Better for Less, which formed the strategy for Cabinet Office's Efficiency and Reform Group, a journal article that has been widely shared in government, the Government IT Strategy, and the Government Strategic Implementation Plan. Mark is a regularly invited industry and government speaker, and is also pioneering these ideas in practice through his London-based consultancy Methods, where he is delivering radical transformational organisational blueprints for over 10 pathfinding government organisations.

  • Tue
    09
    Apr
    2013
    Fri
    12
    Apr
    2013
    Manor Road Building and Law Faculty

    The 6th Price Moot Court Competition International Rounds are taking place in Oxford in April.  40 teams from around the world will compete in front of some of the most prominent figures in media law, and international benches of judges from different legal systems and backgrounds.Participating countries include: Australia, Brazil, China, Ethiopia, Georgia, India, Kenya, Singapore and Ukraine and many more.For more information about the competition, see: http://pricemootcourt.socleg.ox.ac.uk/competitions/oxford/2012-13

  • Fri
    12
    Apr
    2013
    The Cube, Law Faculty

    This workshop will examine the legal issues raised by Lord Justice Leveson's recently published Report into the Culture, Practices, and Ethics of the Press, triggered by the phone hacking scandal at the News of the World.As pressure mounts on the government to implement the proposals for reform of press regulation, a roundtable of experts in media law scholars will assess the legal issues raised by the Report, including the role of the new regulator, the relationship between press and politicians, data protection, and the public interest.

    The workshop will cut through the political rhetoric surrounding the debate and offer an indepth legal analysis of the principles underpinning the proposed reforms, in order to provide a set of fresh contributions to the debate on press regulation in the UK.

    For further details and registration, please visit the Event webpage of the Foundation for Law, Justice and Society: http://www.fljs.org/Leveson-12April

  • Thu
    25
    Apr
    2013
    Fri
    26
    Apr
    2013
    Nairobi, Kenya

    Organised by PCMLP, the Centre for Global Communications Studies, University of Pennsylvania and the Centre for Intellectual Property and Information Technology (CIPIT), Strathmore University Law School

    Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia have developed very distinctive approaches to the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) for governance and peace-building. While the Ethiopian government has sought to capture and monopolize ICTs to support its political agenda, increasing service delivery but minimizing political dissent, in Somalia ICTs and innovation have thrived even in the absence of a central government with multiple internet and telecommunications providers competing to offer access at some of the cheapest prices on the continent. Kenya has emerged as Africa’s innovation hub, but has also faced significant challenges as it has sought to implement extraordinarily ambitious projects, as most recently seen during the 2013 elections when the voting tallying system failed, risking to spark tensions across the country.

    On 25-26 April scholars from Addis Ababa University (Ethiopia), Strathmore University (Kenya), Simad University (Somalia), CIPESA (Uganda), University of Pennsylvania (USA) and Oxford University (UK) will gather in Nairobi to examine the reasons behind the radically different approaches these three neighbors have developed towards ICTs and draw comparative lessons that can be extended to other countries in the continent. The workshop is part of a two-year project funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York on Eliciting and Applying Local Knowledge on Statebuilding and Peacebuilding in Africa.

    Participants include: Abdikarim Mohaidin Ahmed, Simad University, Somalia; Abdi Aynte, Heritage Institute of Policy Studies, Somalia; Isaac Rutenberg, Centre for Intellectual Property and Information Technology (CIPIT), Strathmore University Law School, Kenya; Douglas Gichuki, CIPIT; Christopher Ndungu, CIPIT; Nathan Tuimising, CIPIT; Zenebe Beyene, Addis Ababa University; Abdissa Zerai, Addis Ababa University; Ashnah Kalemera, CIPESA; Lillian Nalwoga, CIPESA; Wakabi Wairagala, CIPESA; Yikunnoamlak Mezgebu Zerabiruk & Gebeyehu Bekele Estifanose, Addis Ababa University; Lauren Kogen, University of Pennsylvania; Iginio Gagliardone, Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP), University of Oxford; Nicole Stremlau, PCMLP.

    Selected sessions will be open to students and other interested participants.  For further information, please contact Iginio Gagliardone: iginio.gagliardone@csls.ox.ac.uk.

  • Wed
    08
    May
    2013
    Wed
    05
    Jun
    2013
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    China’s media environment is a strong focus of attention for journalists and academics around the world. It is seen as the predominant sphere in which political and social change may be fostered, and a bellwether for broader issues in the mercurial China of today. Nonetheless, this debate is often held in black-and-white terms, focusing on censorship and control, while ignoring the much more complex and variegated reality, where fragmented actors continuously negotiate new situations and interests, and where government is often pushed in a reactive role. This term, PCMLP organizes a seminar series that will provide a deeper insight in the different factors shaping regulation and policymaking in relation to the Chinese Internet. These seminars will look at media law and policy developments in China from different angles, in order to provide a more comprehensive view of developments.

    8 May: Micro Opinions in Macro China: Networks Embedded in Hierarchical Structures
    Hui Xue – Ph.D. Candidate, MacQuarie University

    15 May: The Legislative Environment of the Internet in China
    Xia Yan – Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Chongqing University of Post and Telecommunications

    22 May: Regulatory Responses to User-Generated Content on the Chinese Internet
    Bingchun Meng – Lecturer, School of Media and Communications, London School of Economics

    29 May: China Dream, Positive Energy and TV Entertainment: The Tightrope Walking of
    Chinese Provincial TV Stations
    Zhao Yu – Associate Professor, Media & Foreign Culture College, Zhejiang University

    5 June: Developing Media Tort Law in China
    Perry Keller – Senior Lecturer, Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College London

    All are welcome, no registration is necessary. Seminars are followed by drinks and nibbles.
    For more information, e-mail Dr. Rogier Creemers (convenor): rogier.creemers@csls.ox.ac.uk.

  • Wed
    19
    Jun
    2013
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    Much attention has been paid in recent years to the development of media and culture in China.  Often, however, this discussion is limited towards particular topics, including politics, protest and censorship.  At the same time, Chinese culture and media are developing - and often flourishing - in ways that remain less clear to outside observers.  Emerging phenomena such as online literature, mobile content and "self-media" are reshaping economic and social aspects of media and culture, often in unexpected ways.  This seminar benefits from the participation of a number of distinguished scholars from Zhejiang University's Department of Communication and International Culture, who will give us a better sense of important, bottom-up media and culture evolutions occurring in the China of today.

    Participants:
    Wu Fei, Dean, Media and International Culture College, Zhejiang University
    Fan Zhizhong, Dean, Visual Arts and New Media Department, Zhejiang University
    Wei Lu, Assistant Dean, Media and International Culture College
    Jin Lian, Assistant Dean, Media and International Culture College
    Li Hongtao, Associate Professor, Media and International Culture College

    All are welcome, no registration is required. For more information, please contact Dr. Rogier Creemers, Convener (rogier.creemers@csls.ox.ac.uk)

  • Mon
    24
    Jun
    2013
    Fri
    05
    Jul
    2013
    Oxford, UK

    The 15th annual Annenberg-Oxford Media Policy Summer Institute will be held from Monday 24 June to Friday 5 July 2013 at the University of Oxford.  The institute brings together young scholars and regulators from around the world for two weeks to discuss important recent trends in technology, international politics and development and its influence on media policy.

    This year the summer institute will focus on two topics for inquiry and discussion. The first week will concentrate on studying media transitions and development, examining case studies of successful media transitions and analyzing the factors contributing to the development of democratic media systems. We will also examine case studies of transitioning societies, such as Burma, Syria, and Egypt. Part of the first week will also be devoted to new developments in comparative approaches to regulation, looking at Ofcom in the UK and other agencies, including examples from the Middle East, Africa and Asia. During the second week, participants and speakers will take a concentrated look at Internet and social media developments around the globe and the varying effects that these technologies have had on government, society, and global and local media policy. We will also be examining the various ways in which different types of internet actors (governments, domestic and international civil society, and private actors) attempt to influence the internet policy sphere.

    The schedule and participants and other details can be found on the Institute's microsite.

  • Wed
    18
    Sep
    2013
    Fri
    20
    Sep
    2013
    Manor Road Building

    On 19 and 20 September 2013, CSLS and PCMLP will host the annual conference of the Europe-China Law Studies Association. This conference will bring together leading academics, professionals and policymakers working in the area of Chinese law. A provisional programme can be found below. Participation is free, but registration is required as spaces are limited. Please register via e-mail: ecls2013oxford@gmail.com.

    The full programme is available here.

  • Tue
    15
    Oct
    2013
    Seminar Room A, Manor Road Building

    This will be a book launch for Michael Starks new publication on The Digital Television Revolution- Origins to Outcomes.

    Speakers:

    Professor Robert Picard, Director of Research, Reuters Institute

    Michael Starks, Associate of the PCMLP and author of The Digital Television Revolution - Origins to Outcomes

    Mark Thompson, Editor, Open Society Foundations

    Panel discussion and book launch, followed by a wine reception

    Seminar hosted by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism and the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy

  • Mon
    21
    Oct
    2013
    Seminar Room A, Manor Road Building
    As part of the Socio-Legal Studies Seminar Series, Dr Nicole Stremlau presents on Somalia: Media Law in the Absence of a State.

    Somalia is often described as ‘lawless’ or ‘the world’s most failed state’, a characterization that overlooks the way law and governance actually works in the absence of a capable central government. This presentation will explore the role of xeer law, or customary law, in regulating media, including both older media, such as poetry, and newer media, such as mobile phones, in Somalia’s complex legal environment. While Somalia remains one of the most dangerous regions of the world for journalists, dozens of radio stations are broadcasting in South-Central Somalia and there is a competitive newspaper industry in Somaliland. In addition, the telecoms industry is booming with some of the best connections and lowest rates on the continent for the internet and mobile phones. What legal frameworks allow technology and media companies to feel confident to invest in Somalia? Various authorities govern media and resolve conflicts across the Somali territories. To understand media ‘law’ in this region we must look beyond the formal state structures.

  • Fri
    25
    Oct
    2013
    White & Case Lecture Room, Law Faculty

    A workshop presented in collaboration with the National Law University, Delhi

    After the widely publicised revelations by Edward Snowden, India has been alarmed by the discovery that its move to digital communication has resulted in confidential government information becoming easily accessible to the United States of America. The new digital public sphere which was embraced enthusiastically over the last decade, suddenly looks fragile. It appears that the covert and widespread monitoring may have a chilling effect on speech.

    If many now see seemingly-confidential communication on the Internet as vulnerable to intruders, there have also been increasing concerns about more public forms of Internet speech, such as the spread of rumours or images which allegedly incite violence between different communities. The most recent manifestation of this is the Muzaffarnagar violence in India, which has been attributed both to the social media and to inflammatory public speeches. Similar concerns were raised about the role of speech during what was popularly known as the ‘North Eastern Exodus’ in Bangalore. In both situations, the Internet was accused, along with other media, of being responsible for spreading harmful speech.

    This panel will engage with these contemporary issues that envelop both the digital and the traditional media. It will look at the effects of surveillance, prior restraints on speech, intermediaries and other key factors on the public sphere. It will also consider, in this context, the relationship of the traditional media with the Internet. This discussion will take place in the backdrop of evolving democratic engagement in India, and the constitutional jurisprudence that attempts to keep pace with it and with developments in communication technology. It will offer comparative perspectives from other countries grappling with similar concerns.

  • Wed
    30
    Oct
    2013
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    This seminar examines ongoing research on a subset of hate speech, “dangerous speech,” that has a special capacity to catalyse violence. It describes an innovative framework to identify such speech, which was adapted for use in the yearlong Umati project – in which Kenyan monitors scrubbed their country’s online spaces, for hate speech and dangerous speech. They assembled a remarkable dataset, which informed attempts to diminish the force of dangerous speech. The seminar will also explore how a similar approach can be adapted to other normative climates.

    For more information see: http://www.worldpolicy.org/susan-benesch.

  • Fri
    15
    Nov
    2013
    Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

    The increasing availability of data produced through old and new media, from the radio to the mobile phone, and of techniques to analyse them, offers unprecedented opportunities to map and understand ongoing conflicts. New projects have been launched to collect voices, map hate speech, denounce abuses in real time, and track ongoing violence.

    The availability of new tools, however, is also presenting new challenges. Campaigns such as #Kony2012 may give the impression that conflicts can be studied and sometimes resolved at a distance. And while big data offers the opportunity to map some of the trends that characterize a conflict, they may obfuscate how conflict is perceived and understood by those who live and suffer from it. This workshop addresses some of these ongoing trends and challenges, by bringing together scholars from different disciplines to understand how information in conflict and post-conflict areas can be gathered, interpreted and analysed in complementary ways.

    PANEL I, 14.00 – 15.20
    Chair: Iginio Gagliardone (Programme in Comparative Media Law & Policy, CSLS, University of Oxford)

    Hate Speech and Social Media: Understanding Users, Networks and Information Flows
    William Housley, Adam Edwards and Matthew Williams (COSMOS, Cardiff University)

    Patterns of Justification in Hate Speech and Violence
    Jonathan Leader Maynard (New College, University of Oxford)

    PANEL II, 15.40 – 17.00
    Chair: Richard Caplan (Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford)

    The fear factor is a main thing: How information on security shapes authority: The case of the Lord’s Resistance Army
    Mareike Schomerus and Anouk S. Rigterink (Justice and Security Research Programme, London School of Economics)

    Managing Public Opinion in China: More Speech, More Sophisticated Control
    Thomas Kellogg (Northeast Asia Program Director, Open Society Foundations)

    17.00 Wine Reception

    About Us: The Interpretive Analysis Network (IAN) is a space created by the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Oxford to reflect on innovations and challenges in using qualitative research methods in the social sciences. For more information about IAN, please visit the IAN Weblearn site, join us on Facebook. IAN is convened by Dr Iginio Gagliardone (iginio.gagliardone@csls.ox.ac.uk) and Kate Roll (kate.roll@gtc.ox.ac.uk)

  • Fri
    15
    Nov
    2013
    Seminar Room A, Manor Road Building

    Speaker: Thomas Kellogg (Open Society Foundations)

    For much of 2013, a vigorous and wide-ranging debate has raged in intellectual circles in China over the need for constitutional reform. The debate has seen the emergence of three camps: the socialist constitutionalists, who favour a gradualist reform path that adheres to the current constitution; the liberals, who are sceptical that meaningful reform can and will take place under existing constitutional arrangements; and the Leftists, who have vigorously attacked reform proposals as no more than thinly-veiled attempts to undermine the one-Party state.

    This debate, which reached its apex during the summer months, has now quieted somewhat, with socialist constitutionalists reasserting their position as the voice of the moderate mainstream. Though the outpouring of commentary has not led to any specific reforms, nonetheless it did demonstrate the strong consensus among academics and intellectuals in favour of constitutional change. The debate also highlighted the frustration among many intellectuals over the glacial pace of legal and political reform over the past decade, and served as a vehicle for public outreach and education on the meaning of and prospects for constitutional development in China.

    All are welcome, no registration is necessary. For more information, please contact Dr. Rogier Creemers (convener): rogier.creemers@csls.ox.ac.uk.

  • Mon
    18
    Nov
    2013
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    This talk is being given by Dr Paolo Cavaliere as part of the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies Michaelmas Term 2013 Seminar Series.

  • Mon
    25
    Nov
    2013
    Seminar Room E, Manor Road Building

    Speaker: Lucy Montgomery (Knowledge Unlatched)

    Although digital technology has made it possible for many more people to access content at no extra cost, fewer people than ever before are able to read the books written by university-based researchers.

    This presentation explores the role that open access licenses and collective action might play in reviving the scholarly monograph: a specialised area of academic publishing that has seen sales decline by more than 90% over the past three decades.

    It also introduces Knowledge Unlatched, an ambitious attempt to create an internationally coordinated, sustainable route to open access for scholarly books.  Knowledge Unlatched is now in its pilot phase: seeking support from at least 200 libraries from around the world to ‘unlatch’ a collection of 28 new titles.

    Dr Lucy Montgomery is a Vice Chancellor’s Research Fellow at Queensland University of Technology and Deputy Director of Knowledge Unlatched. She is interested in the role of digital technology and intellectual property in business model innovation in the creative industries.

    All are welcome, no registration is necessary. For more information, please contact Dr. Rogier Creemers (convener): rogier.creemers@csls.ox.ac.uk

  • Fri
    10
    Jan
    2014
    Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

    A Roundtable Discussion organised by PCMLP and the Oxford University China Centre

    John Garnaut (Fairfax Media)
    James Barker (British Embassy in Beijing)
    Rana Mitter (Oxford University)
    Chair: Ross Garnaut

    Questions about military affairs have had an irreplaceable role in Chinese political developments since the late days of the Qing Dynasty. Military modernization was seen as a vital part in strengthening the nation, but at the same time, military power has often been used to decide domestic political questions. This ambiguous position concerning the military persists until the present day.

    All are welcome, no registration is necessary, the event will be followed by wine and nibbles. For more information, please contact Dr Rogier Creemers (convener), rogier.creemers@csls.ox.ac.uk.

  • Fri
    17
    Jan
    2014
    Lecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

    A Roundtable Discussion organised by PCMLP and the Oxford University China Centre

    John Garnaut (Fairfax Media)
    Jane Macartney (The Times)
    Vincent Ni (Caixin)

    The amount of reporting on China in the global press has greatly expanded over the past years. Numbers of reporters within China have grown, and the journalist corps has had an increasing impact on the way that China is perceived abroad, but also on domestic Chinese politics. This roundtable will discuss the evolving role and position of China reporters with three senior journalists.

    All are welcome, no registration is necessary, the event will be followed by wine and nibbles. For more information, please contact Dr Rogier Creemers (convener), rogier.creemers@csls.ox.ac.uk.

  • Fri
    24
    Jan
    2014
    Wolfson College, Oxford

    Citizen journalism has come to international prominence as it enables ordinary citizens to reach out to wide audiences with a speed and global reach which has never been seen before, giving voice to alternative stories and perspectives.  The rise of such outlets has changed traditional patterns of production and consumption of news, the relationship between professional and non-professional media, the dynamics between the media sphere and communities/societies, and eventually challenges the definition, obligations and legal safeguards of journalists.

    The conference aims to bring academics and practitioners from various backgrounds to discuss the social and legal implications of this phenomenon from different geographical and cultural perspectives, in order to address the complex interplay between new technologies, that span their effect at the global level, their impact in various social contexts, and the different legal responses at the national and regional level.

    Programme

    9.30-10.30 Keynote Speech

    Lim Ming Kuok - Assistant Programme Specialist, Communication and Information Sector, UNESCO

    10.30-12.30 Citizen Journalism and new technologies: opportunities and challenges for news dissemination in the digital era

    Chair: Professor William Dutton, Professor of Internet Studies, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford

    • Kevin Anderson, Freelance journalist and digital strategist
    • Mike Rispoli, Communications Manager, Privacy International
    • Solana Larsen, Managing Editor, Global Voices

    12.30-13.30 Lunch

    13.30-15.30 The social contexts of citizen journalism: the place for individual news disseminators within societies and communities

    Chair: Iginio Gagliardone, Research Fellow, PCMLP, University of Oxford

    • Libby Powell, Co-founder and CEO, Radar
    • Kristin Skare Orgeret, Professor, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences
    • Solana Larsen, Managing Editor, Global Voices

    15.30-16.00 Coffee Break

    16.00-18.00 Citizen journalism between rights and responsibilities: towards new legal and ethical standards?

    Chair: Jacob Rowbottom, Fellow in Law, University of Oxford

    • Tarlach McGonagle, Senior Researcher, University of Amsterdam
    • Judith Townend, Freelance journalist and Ph.D. candidate, City University London
    • Jim Boumelha, President, International Federation of Journalists
    • Peter Noorlander, Chief Executive, Media Legal Defence Initiative

    All are welcome to attend. In order to reserve a place, please contact: louise.scott@csls.ox.ac.uk.

  • Tue
    28
    Jan
    2014
    Oxford Internet Institute, 1 St Giles, Oxford OX1 3JS

    Speaker: Professor Richard Heeks, University of Manchester

    With the Millennium Development Goals about to reach their sell-by date, the new post-2015 development agenda is currently being formulated. This talk explores that agenda and its implications for ICT4D (information and communication technologies for development) research priorities. The presentation begins with an overview of the post-2015 process and a cross-check that the new agenda is worth attending to.

    Arguing it will be the single most important shaper of future development priorities, the talk then analyses three aspects of the post-2015 framework compared to that inspired by the MDGs: elements of the agenda that are becoming less important; issues which continue; and new issues and ideas that are on the rise. With two years to go until the post-2015 framework is activated, now is a good time to consider the implications of this comparison for our future research priorities in the sub-discipline of ‘development informatics’, and the extent to which these might – or might not – cohere around a vision of “Development 2.0”.

    Twitter hashtag: #oxict4d

    Please email your name and affiliation to events@oii.ox.ac.uk or telephone +44 (0)1865 287210.

  • Mon
    03
    Feb
    2014
    Oxford Internet Institute, 1 St Giles, Oxford OX1 3JS

    Speaker: Gregory Asmolov, LSE

    The presentation suggests applying the notion of activity systems and zones of proximal development, as conceptualized in Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), to the field of ICT4D. Relying on the principles and analytical apparatus of CHAT (Vygotsky; Leontiev, 1978; Engeström, 1989) it discusses crowdsourcing platforms and online mapping applications as artifacts that mediate activity systems.

    Based on case studies from the field of crisis response, the presentation discusses various structures of activity systems that are mediated through information technologies. The talk also seeks to establish association between the structure of activity system and the degree of statehood in particular socio-political environment (Livingston & Walter-Drop, 2013). The presentation relies on a fieldwork conducted in Australia and Russia in 2013.

    Twitter hashtag: #oxict4d

    Please email your name and affiliation to events@oii.ox.ac.uk or telephone +44 (0)1865 287210.

  • Tue
    11
    Feb
    2014
    Oxford Internet Institute, 1 St Giles, Oxford OX1 3JS

    Dr Dan McQuillan, from Goldsmiths, University London, will give a talk as part of the ICT4D Seminar Series.

    This seminar will examine the Internet in a post-PRISM world, and ask if its power to tackle global poverty will be lost. While recognising the danger of nation states breaking up the Internet, I will concentrate on the already existing threat of tracking & big data and the emergence of algorithmic regulation.

    ICT4D may never have delivered on the promise of development anyway, so I won't mourn its passing but will point instead to the risk of a neocolonial cybernetics running across the Internet and the Internet of Things, and the risk of renewed subjugation through ideas like Smart Slums. Based on my experiences with civic hacking and the crypytoparty movement, I will identify participatory methodologies and critical pedagogy as key to post-digital citizenship and to our ability to disrupt predictive 'states of exception'.

    For more information see The Changing Faces of Citizen Action: A Mapping Study through an ‘Unruly’ Lenshttp://www.ids.ac.uk/publication/the-changing-faces-of-citizen-action-a-mapping-study-through-an-unruly-lens

    Please email your name and affiliation to events@oii.ox.ac.uk or telephone +44 (0)1865 287210.

  • Tue
    18
    Feb
    2014
    4:30 pmOxford Internet Institute, 1 St Giles, Oxford OX1 3JS

    David Souter, from the London School of Economics, gives a presentation as part of the ICT4D Seminar Series.

    The presentation will use the history and development of ICT4D - and its relationships with both development policy and the ICT sector - as a framework to critique ICT4D approaches and consider the relevance of ICTs and ICT4D to the post-2015 development agenda.

    It will draw, inter alia, on recent work for the World Bank, to assess ICTs in post-conflict reconstruction; for the International Institute for Sustainable Development, to address the relationship between ICTs and sustainability; and for UNCTAD and the UN Commission on Science and Technology for Development, to consider the implications of emerging ICT trends for developmental outcomes.

    Twitter hashtag: #oxict4d

    Please email your name and affiliation to events@oii.ox.ac.uk or telephone +44 (0)1865 287210.

  • Tue
    27
    Jan
    2015
    Tue
    03
    Mar
    2015
    Oxford Internet Institute, 1 St Giles, Oxford OX1 3JS

    This seminar series gathers leading scholars and practitioners to reflect on the influence of new communication technologies on development processes. The seminars will focus on the dramatic changes in citizens' ability to coordinate and mobilize for political action, on global migration and its relation to digital media, and on how international and national actors are seeking to shape the applications of technology and communication. The series provides a focus point for academics and non-academics in Oxford who are interested in the challenges and opportunities of employing new communication technologies in development contexts.

    The series is organized by the Oxford Internet Institute (OII), the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP), the Department of International Development (ODID) and the Technology & Management for Development Centre (TMD) at the University of Oxford, and co-convened by Dr Iginio Gagliardone and Dr Mark Graham.

    These seminars will take place on Tuesday evenings from 4:30pm to 6:00pm at the Oxford Internet Institute (address above). They will each be followed by a short drinks reception.

    Registration is recommended: please email your name and affiliation to events@oii.ox.ac.uk or telephone +44 (0)1865 287210.
    Twitter hashtag: #oxict4d

    27 January, 2015
    ICT, Civic Education and Civil Society Capacity Building in Iran
    Speaker: Mariam Memarsadeghi Tavaana, Director E-Learning Institute for Iranian Civil Society
    Since Tavaana's launch in 2010, the e-learning institute has safely educated thousands of Iranians about democracy and human rights. Through our live e-classes, documentaries and lectures aired on satellite TV, robust social networks, dissemination of ebooks and more, we are able to teach and inspire civic discourse about highly censored topics such as democratic transition, feminism, Islamic reformation, and LGBT rights. Our materials reach 7-15 million Iranians each week via Facebook alone, and over 15 million Iranians via satellite TV. We've learned great lessons from the potential of the Internet in reaching and supporting civil societies in even the most repressive regimes, and about cultivating via overlapping technologies a culture of human rights and liberalism.

    3 February, 2015
    Dying for an iPhone: The Hidden Struggle of China’s Workers
    Speaker: Jenny Chan, University of Oxford
    During 2010, 18 workers attempted suicide at Taiwanese-owned Foxconn Technology Group's Chinese facilities, where Apple and other high profile branded products are produced and assembled. They ranged in age from 17 to 25 - the prime of youth. Fourteen died, while four survived with crippling injuries. What had driven the young Chinese workers to commit the desperate act? What light did they cast on China's much touted economic transformation in the era of export-oriented growth? The mystery that our investigation seeks to explore is not only the "inside story" of Foxconn; it is also the nature of global capitalism embodying with specific relationship between Foxconn and its buyers, the largest and richest being Apple, as well as that between Foxconn and the Chinese state. These are the relationships that shape conditions on the factory floor and ultimately workers' lives. An in-depth study of the most powerful electronics contractor and the lives of its 1.4 million workers enable us to draw out the deep contradictions among labor, capital, and the Chinese state in global IT production.

    10 February, 2015
    Ethical Treatment of Data in New Digital Landscapes - bringing development practitioners and academics together
    Speaker: Amy O'Donnell, Oxfam
    Data has invaluable applications to ensure organisations like Oxfam are needs driven and responsive, meanwhile there are also huge risks to communities if the related processes are not designed and managed in a responsible manner. Adopting meaningful approaches to data security and ethical methodology is not a new effort within Oxfam and the development community nor is it for academics. What is new, however, is the way that the changing digital landscape is presenting new challenges and opportunities which we must react to and ensure staff have resources and knowledge about how to collect, store, manage, use and even dispose of data responsibly. How can NGOs like Oxfam come together with academics and practitioners alike to tackle emerging privacy and security challenges when it comes to effective management of data? As Oxfam are in the process of applying a Responsible Data Policy, how can we learn from and support one another, particularly when it comes to guidance and what policy means in practice?

    24 February, 2015
    Combatting Corruption with Mobile Phones
    Speaker: Vivek Srinivasan, Stanford University
    India’s right to information movement demonstrated the potential to combat corruption through social audits – an exercise to share and verify public records with people. But this process requires a lot of time, skill and organizational effort – thanks to which very few audits are organized in India despite its potential. We hope to change this by creating digital tools for activists, which they can use to organize social audits continuously at low cost, and thus challenge corruption in a sustained manner. The technology involves collecting public records online, disseminating it to people via mobile phones and collecting their feedback so that the activists can redress grievances in a timely manner. I will share the progress of the project so far in this talk.

    3 March, 2015
    Africa’s Information Revolution: Rhetoric and Reality
    Speaker: Padraig Carmody, University of Dublin
    Over the past decade there has been a phenomenal growth in mobile phone and internet usage in Africa which has attracted substantial media and academic interest. However questions remain about the economically transformative nature and potential of this diffusion of communication infrastructures and artefacts. Based on over two hundred firm level interviews in Tanzania and South Africa this paper explores the impacts of the “information revolution” on small and medium enterprise development. Contrary to perceptions it finds evidence of thin integration, devaluation and neo, rather than disintermediation. The implications of this for African development are then explored.

  • Wed
    20
    May
    2015
    4:30 amLecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

    This year's Annual Socio-Legal Lecture will be given by Professor Abduallhi An-Na'im, the Howard Candler Professor of Law and Emory University.  Professor An-Na'im has written extensively about freedom of expression issues in Islamic law. This lecture will focus on "Sharia and Constitutionalism in Islamic Societies".

    The lecture will be followed by a wine and cheese reception in the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies.

    Professor Abdullahi An-Na’im  (from Sudan) is the Charles Howard Candler Professor of Law at Emory Law. An-Na‘im is the author of many acclaimed books including: What is an American Muslim (2014); Muslims and Global Justice (2011); Islam and the Secular State (2008); African Constitutionalism and the Role of Islam (2006); and Toward an Islamic Reformation: Civil liberties, human rights and international law (1990).  He also published more than 60 articles and book chapters on human rights, constitutionalism and Islam and politics in African and Islamic countries.

  • Wed
    27
    May
    2015
    6:30 amSomerset House, London

    C4D Network panel discussion 'Proving the impact of communication' where we will explore the pressures and the 'how to' of proving that communications work with lots of time for questions and discussion.

    The speakers for the event are:

    Kate Lloyd-Morgan of Mediae Trust who will discuss her research on the impact of 'Shamba Shape-Up' a TV show on farming in Kenya.

    Nicole Stremlau from the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy, University of Oxford, who will discuss her research 'In Search of Evidence' in the field of media assistance.

    Sarah Cardey, Lecturer in International Development, University of Reading, who will discuss some of the difficulties experienced in proving impact on an agricultural project in Uganda.

    The Chair will be Mary Myers from the C4D Network.

  • Mon
    22
    Jun
    2015
    Tue
    23
    Jun
    2015
    Manor Road Building, University of Oxford

    A launch workshop by Oxford Transitional Justice Research (OTJR) and Fondation Hirondelle for a new online platform justiceinfo.net. The workshop aims at developing a better understanding of what role different media can play to inform the practice and policy-making of TJ processes. We are particularly interested in exploring the complex relationship between academic research, the practices of TJ institutions and the media.

    For this purpose, this international workshop will bring together journalists, academics and TJ practitioners to discuss the following questions: 

    -          In what ways can media influence transitional justice policy-making and practice?

    -          How can innovative media tools be used to inform different audiences about global, national and local TJ processes?

    -          What are the challenges for independent media coverage and analysis in volatile conflict- and post-conflict settings and how can they be addressed?

    -          What are possible pathways to an effective collaboration between academia, TJ institutions and media?

    -          How can JusticeInfo.Net be tailored in terms of content, format and methodology to address the needs of affected communities and to empower local media?

     If you would like to attend the workshop please RSVP to Elena Butti (Elena.Butti@law.ox.ac.uk) by 15 June 2015. 

    Innovative-Media-for-Change-Workshop-Programme-FINAL 25.5

  • Sun
    28
    Jun
    2015
    Sat
    11
    Jul
    2015
    University of Oxford

    We are looking forward to welcoming our 2015 cohort of participants to the annual Annenberg-Oxford Media Policy Summer Institute. For over 15 years PCMLP has organised this event, most recently in collaboration with the Centre for Global Communications Studies (CGCS) at the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg School for Communication.   It is a unique opportunity for young scholars and regulators from around the world to discuss important recent trends in technology, international politics and development and its influence on media policy. Further details about the programme can be found on the Institute's dedicated website.

  • Wed
    14
    Oct
    2015
    9.00-5.00Haldane Room, Wolfson College

    In association with the Foundation for Law, Justice and Society

    In enabling the creation and rapid spread of social media, the internet has created a new social arena in which vast numbers of people are engaged.

    In common with other social arenas, such as the family, the school, the corporation, cyber-society is rapidly developing its own social structure of understandings, normative conventions, and regulatory mechanisms.

    This workshop will identify the key concepts that make up the cognitive, normative, and regulatory structure of the cyber-society, and consider the implications of these amorpohous and unregulated online social spaces for personal identity, freedom of expression, privacy, and state sovereignty.

    Participants

    Denis Galligan, Professor of Socio-Legal Studies, University of Oxford
    Iginio Gagliardone, British Academy Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, University of Oxford
    Bernie Hogan, Research Fellow, Oxford Internet Institute
    Jacob Rowbottom, Associate Professor of Law, University of Oxford
    Nicole Stremlau, Research Fellow, Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy, Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford
    Damian Tambini, Senior Lecturer, Department of Media and Communications, LSE
    Ying Yu, Research Fellow, Wolfson College, University of Oxford, and Programme Coordinator, FLJS Consumer Rights in China Programme
  • Mon
    16
    Nov
    2015
    Oxford, UK

    Joint workshop with the Centre de Recherché en Information et Communication, ULB

    The workshop gathers researchers working on the interaction between media and politics in Africa. More specifically, it builds bridges between Francophone and Anglophone researchers exploring the role of the media in different cultural regions of the continent, as the media systems, journalists’ practices or the economy of the sector show some striking contrasts, from one place to the other. The colonial legacy still has a strong impact on, for instance, the language used by the newspapers, the organization of the broadcasting sector and the involvement of the state in shaping the internet and new media.

    The discussion will focus on key issues around elections and conflicts. Whenever possible contemporary papers and analyses will be mixed with more historical approaches. The workshop will seek to focus on historical trajectories and the political ideas and ideologies that have shaped the development of media. Countries to be discussed include Ethiopia, the DRC, Zambia, Kenya, South Africa and Burundi.

  • Mon
    23
    Nov
    2015
    Tue
    24
    Nov
    2015
    University of Oxford

    We are pleased to announce that the University of Oxford will be hosting the forthcoming conference on “Arcs in Internet Regulation: Assessing New Directions” on November 23rd and 24th in Oxford.  This is part of the annual Peking-Oxford-Stanford series in Internet Law and Policy. This conference builds on previous annual events and focuses on significant issues in Internet law and policy that will require attention in the coming years, such as digital human rights, smart cities, new technologies and courts, and Internet governance and development.

    The conference draws primarily on the strengths of the three universities involved, and their networks, bringing together a unique collection of scholars and students, government officials, corporate executives, and civil society representatives with the goal of informing research and strengthening the understanding of alternative viewpoints with a focus on the US, Europe and China, as well as global challenges

    This is an extraordinary opportunity to debate and discuss the future of the Internet. The Conference is hosted by the University of Oxford’s Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy in the Faculty of Law’s Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, with generous support from Tencent. Additional information can be found here.

  • Thu
    26
    Nov
    2015
    Sun
    29
    Nov
    2015
    New Delhi, India

    The South Asia Rounds of the Price Media Law Moot Court Programme are organised in collaboration with our partners at the National Law University, Delhi. Further information about the South Asia Rounds, and associated seminars and events, can be found here.

  • Fri
    04
    Dec
    2015
    Sun
    06
    Dec
    2015
    Belgrade, Serbia

    The South East Europe Rounds of the Price Media Law Moot Court Programme are organised in collaboration with our partners at the University of Belgrade. Further information about the South East Europe Rounds, and associated seminars and events, can be found here.

  • Mon
    21
    Dec
    2015
    Wed
    23
    Dec
    2015
    Beijing, China

    The Asia Pacific Rounds of the Price Media Law Moot Court Programme are organised in collaboration with our partners at the Renmin University, Beijing. Further information about the South Asia Rounds, and associated seminars and events, can be found here.

  • Wed
    27
    Jan
    2016
    Sun
    31
    Jan
    2016
    Cardozo School of Law, New York, USA

    The Americas Rounds of the Price Media Law Moot Court Programme are organised in collaboration with our partners at the Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School (University of Pennsylvania), and the Cardozo School of Law, New York. Further information about the Americas Rounds, and associated seminars and events, can be found here.

  • Mon
    01
    Feb
    2016
    Thu
    04
    Feb
    2016
    Cairo, Eygpt

    The Middle East Rounds of the Price Media Law Moot Court Programme are organised in collaboration with our partners at the Ain Shams University, Cairo. Further information about the Middle East Rounds, and associated seminars and events, can be found here.

  • Tue
    29
    Mar
    2016
    Sat
    02
    Apr
    2016
    Oxford, United Kingdom

    The International Rounds of the Price Media Law Moot Court Programme take place in Oxford, United Kingdom. Further information about the International Rounds, and associated seminars and events, can be found here.

  • Mon
    27
    Jun
    2016
    Fri
    08
    Jul
    2016
    all dayOxford, UK

    For seventeen years, the Institute has brought together top early career communications scholars, media lawyers and regulators, internet governance experts, and freedom of expression and human rights activists from countries around the world to discuss the effects of technology and policy from a global and multidisciplinary perspective. The Summer Institute provides participants with an intensive two week interdisciplinary curriculum that combines expert instruction from media policymakers and scholars with hands-on activities such as stakeholder mapping, policy analysis, group case studies, and participant presentations. Additional information on this programme can be found here.

  • Wed
    24
    Aug
    2016
    all dayRift Valley Institute, Nairobi, Kenya

    Traditional and digital media play a significant role in conflicts that accompany and follow transitions to democracy. The way they interact with political and civil society actors is determinant in framing particularly critical moments in the political history of a country, such as contested elections or controversial campaigns. The nexus of media, politics and civil society can determine the possibility to stymie the risk of violence or hold authorities or security forces to account. The aim of this workshop is to bring together political authorities, journalists, civil society activists and academics to discuss the nexus of media and politics against the backdrop of the 2013 political elections and the 2014 anti-terror operation Usalama Watch, while looking ahead to the 2017 elections. The three roundtables will encourage a dialogue and discussion about “what went right” and “what went wrong” during these critical events that tested the resilience of Kenyan democracy. Moreover, by highlighting critical issues, the discussion will likely offer insights and food for thought ahead of 2017 elections.

    The full MeCoDem Workshop Programme is available.

  • Thu
    17
    Nov
    2016
    Sun
    20
    Nov
    2016
    New Delhi, India

    The seventh annual South Asia Regional Rounds, hosted in partnership with the Centre for Communication Governance at National Law University, Delhi, will take place from 17 to 20 November, 2016 in Delhi. More information can be found here.

  • Wed
    30
    Nov
    2016
    Fri
    02
    Dec
    2016
    Beijing, China

    The forth Asia-Pacific Regional Rounds, hosted in partnership with Law School & Aisa-Pacific Institute of Law, Renmin University of China, will took place from 30 November to 2 December, 2016 in Beijing. More information can be found here.

  • Sat
    10
    Dec
    2016
    Sun
    11
    Dec
    2016
    Shenzhen, China

    The annual conference brings together academics from Peking, Stanford and Oxford Universities to discuss and debate topics such as Innovation and Development; Cybersecurity; and Privacy and Data Protection, among other topics. A full agenda will be available shortly.  Details of the previous conference, hosted at Oxford, can be found here.

  • Fri
    16
    Dec
    2016
    Sun
    18
    Dec
    2016
    Zagreb, Croatia

    The fifth annual South East Europe Regional Rounds, hosted in partnership with the University of Zagreb, will take place from 16 to 18 December, 2016 in Zagreb. More information can be found here.

  • Wed
    21
    Dec
    2016
    Fri
    23
    Dec
    2016
    Kyiv, Ukraine

    The first annual North East Europe Regional Rounds, hosted in partnership with Kyiv-Mohyla Academy and Centre for democracy and rule of law, will take place from the 21 to the 23 December, 2016 in Kyiv. More information can be found here.

  • Wed
    25
    Jan
    2017
    Sun
    29
    Jan
    2017
    New York, USA

    The fifth annual Americas Regional Rounds, hosted in partnership with the Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School (University of Pennsylvania), will take place from 25 to 29 of January, 2017 at Cardozo School of Law in New York. More information can be found here.

  • Mon
    30
    Jan
    2017
    Thu
    02
    Feb
    2017
    Cairo, Egypt

    The fifth annual Middle East Regional Rounds, will take place from the 30 January to the 2 February, 2017 in Cairo. More information can be found here.

  • Mon
    06
    Feb
    2017
    Wed
    08
    Feb
    2017
    Lagos, Nigeria

    We are glad to announce that the Price Media Law Moot Court Competition will be supporting West African Regional Round in Lagos, Nigeria from 6 – 8 February, 2017. The Competition will be hosted by the University of Lagos Faculty of Law, and will be happy to host teams from West Africa. More information can be found here.

  • Mon
    03
    Apr
    2017
    Fri
    07
    Apr
    2017
    Oxford, UK

    The 2017 International Rounds of the 10th annual Price Media Law Moot Court Competition will take place in Oxford, England from 3 April until 7 April 2017. More information can be found here.

  • Mon
    03
    Apr
    2017
    9:00 amLaw Faculty, University of Oxford

    What was long a matter of spirited but largely episodic debate—how to isolate, identify and fashion societal responses to the certain categories of speech—has now expanded into a complex and immediate problem of large-scale institutional response.  Terrorism, intense polarization, new global arrangements and the rise of fake news have all influenced national and international approaches.  This conference addresses how we should respond to these challenges.

  • Mon
    26
    Jun
    2017
    Fri
    07
    Jul
    2017
    Oxford, UK

    The Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania and the Programme for Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford (PCMLP) are pleased to invite applications to the 19th annual Annenberg-Oxford Media Policy Summer Institute, to be held from Monday, June 26 to Friday, July 7, 2017 at the University of Oxford. More information can be found here.