• Tue
    27
    Jan
    2015
    Tue
    03
    Mar
    2015
    Oxford Internet Institute, 1 St Giles, Oxford OX1 3JS

    This seminar series gathers leading scholars and practitioners to reflect on the influence of new communication technologies on development processes. The seminars will focus on the dramatic changes in citizens' ability to coordinate and mobilize for political action, on global migration and its relation to digital media, and on how international and national actors are seeking to shape the applications of technology and communication. The series provides a focus point for academics and non-academics in Oxford who are interested in the challenges and opportunities of employing new communication technologies in development contexts.

    The series is organized by the Oxford Internet Institute (OII), the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP), the Department of International Development (ODID) and the Technology & Management for Development Centre (TMD) at the University of Oxford, and co-convened by Dr Iginio Gagliardone and Dr Mark Graham.

    These seminars will take place on Tuesday evenings from 4:30pm to 6:00pm at the Oxford Internet Institute (address above). They will each be followed by a short drinks reception.

    Registration is recommended: please email your name and affiliation to events@oii.ox.ac.uk or telephone +44 (0)1865 287210.
    Twitter hashtag: #oxict4d

    27 January, 2015
    ICT, Civic Education and Civil Society Capacity Building in Iran
    Speaker: Mariam Memarsadeghi Tavaana, Director E-Learning Institute for Iranian Civil Society
    Since Tavaana's launch in 2010, the e-learning institute has safely educated thousands of Iranians about democracy and human rights. Through our live e-classes, documentaries and lectures aired on satellite TV, robust social networks, dissemination of ebooks and more, we are able to teach and inspire civic discourse about highly censored topics such as democratic transition, feminism, Islamic reformation, and LGBT rights. Our materials reach 7-15 million Iranians each week via Facebook alone, and over 15 million Iranians via satellite TV. We've learned great lessons from the potential of the Internet in reaching and supporting civil societies in even the most repressive regimes, and about cultivating via overlapping technologies a culture of human rights and liberalism.

    3 February, 2015
    Dying for an iPhone: The Hidden Struggle of China’s Workers
    Speaker: Jenny Chan, University of Oxford
    During 2010, 18 workers attempted suicide at Taiwanese-owned Foxconn Technology Group's Chinese facilities, where Apple and other high profile branded products are produced and assembled. They ranged in age from 17 to 25 - the prime of youth. Fourteen died, while four survived with crippling injuries. What had driven the young Chinese workers to commit the desperate act? What light did they cast on China's much touted economic transformation in the era of export-oriented growth? The mystery that our investigation seeks to explore is not only the "inside story" of Foxconn; it is also the nature of global capitalism embodying with specific relationship between Foxconn and its buyers, the largest and richest being Apple, as well as that between Foxconn and the Chinese state. These are the relationships that shape conditions on the factory floor and ultimately workers' lives. An in-depth study of the most powerful electronics contractor and the lives of its 1.4 million workers enable us to draw out the deep contradictions among labor, capital, and the Chinese state in global IT production.

    10 February, 2015
    Ethical Treatment of Data in New Digital Landscapes - bringing development practitioners and academics together
    Speaker: Amy O'Donnell, Oxfam
    Data has invaluable applications to ensure organisations like Oxfam are needs driven and responsive, meanwhile there are also huge risks to communities if the related processes are not designed and managed in a responsible manner. Adopting meaningful approaches to data security and ethical methodology is not a new effort within Oxfam and the development community nor is it for academics. What is new, however, is the way that the changing digital landscape is presenting new challenges and opportunities which we must react to and ensure staff have resources and knowledge about how to collect, store, manage, use and even dispose of data responsibly. How can NGOs like Oxfam come together with academics and practitioners alike to tackle emerging privacy and security challenges when it comes to effective management of data? As Oxfam are in the process of applying a Responsible Data Policy, how can we learn from and support one another, particularly when it comes to guidance and what policy means in practice?

    24 February, 2015
    Combatting Corruption with Mobile Phones
    Speaker: Vivek Srinivasan, Stanford University
    India’s right to information movement demonstrated the potential to combat corruption through social audits – an exercise to share and verify public records with people. But this process requires a lot of time, skill and organizational effort – thanks to which very few audits are organized in India despite its potential. We hope to change this by creating digital tools for activists, which they can use to organize social audits continuously at low cost, and thus challenge corruption in a sustained manner. The technology involves collecting public records online, disseminating it to people via mobile phones and collecting their feedback so that the activists can redress grievances in a timely manner. I will share the progress of the project so far in this talk.

    3 March, 2015
    Africa’s Information Revolution: Rhetoric and Reality
    Speaker: Padraig Carmody, University of Dublin
    Over the past decade there has been a phenomenal growth in mobile phone and internet usage in Africa which has attracted substantial media and academic interest. However questions remain about the economically transformative nature and potential of this diffusion of communication infrastructures and artefacts. Based on over two hundred firm level interviews in Tanzania and South Africa this paper explores the impacts of the “information revolution” on small and medium enterprise development. Contrary to perceptions it finds evidence of thin integration, devaluation and neo, rather than disintermediation. The implications of this for African development are then explored.

  • Wed
    20
    May
    2015
    4:30 amLecture Theatre, Manor Road Building

    This year's Annual Socio-Legal Lecture will be given by Professor Abduallhi An-Na'im, the Howard Candler Professor of Law and Emory University.  Professor An-Na'im has written extensively about freedom of expression issues in Islamic law. This lecture will focus on "Sharia and Constitutionalism in Islamic Societies".

    The lecture will be followed by a wine and cheese reception in the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies.

    Professor Abdullahi An-Na’im  (from Sudan) is the Charles Howard Candler Professor of Law at Emory Law. An-Na‘im is the author of many acclaimed books including: What is an American Muslim (2014); Muslims and Global Justice (2011); Islam and the Secular State (2008); African Constitutionalism and the Role of Islam (2006); and Toward an Islamic Reformation: Civil liberties, human rights and international law (1990).  He also published more than 60 articles and book chapters on human rights, constitutionalism and Islam and politics in African and Islamic countries.

  • Wed
    27
    May
    2015
    6:30 amSomerset House, London

    C4D Network panel discussion 'Proving the impact of communication' where we will explore the pressures and the 'how to' of proving that communications work with lots of time for questions and discussion.

    The speakers for the event are:

    Kate Lloyd-Morgan of Mediae Trust who will discuss her research on the impact of 'Shamba Shape-Up' a TV show on farming in Kenya.

    Nicole Stremlau from the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy, University of Oxford, who will discuss her research 'In Search of Evidence' in the field of media assistance.

    Sarah Cardey, Lecturer in International Development, University of Reading, who will discuss some of the difficulties experienced in proving impact on an agricultural project in Uganda.

    The Chair will be Mary Myers from the C4D Network.

  • Mon
    22
    Jun
    2015
    Tue
    23
    Jun
    2015
    Manor Road Building, University of Oxford

    A launch workshop by Oxford Transitional Justice Research (OTJR) and Fondation Hirondelle for a new online platform justiceinfo.net. The workshop aims at developing a better understanding of what role different media can play to inform the practice and policy-making of TJ processes. We are particularly interested in exploring the complex relationship between academic research, the practices of TJ institutions and the media.

    For this purpose, this international workshop will bring together journalists, academics and TJ practitioners to discuss the following questions: 

    -          In what ways can media influence transitional justice policy-making and practice?

    -          How can innovative media tools be used to inform different audiences about global, national and local TJ processes?

    -          What are the challenges for independent media coverage and analysis in volatile conflict- and post-conflict settings and how can they be addressed?

    -          What are possible pathways to an effective collaboration between academia, TJ institutions and media?

    -          How can JusticeInfo.Net be tailored in terms of content, format and methodology to address the needs of affected communities and to empower local media?

     If you would like to attend the workshop please RSVP to Elena Butti (Elena.Butti@law.ox.ac.uk) by 15 June 2015. 

    Innovative-Media-for-Change-Workshop-Programme-FINAL 25.5

  • Sun
    28
    Jun
    2015
    Sat
    11
    Jul
    2015
    University of Oxford

    We are looking forward to welcoming our 2015 cohort of participants to the annual Annenberg-Oxford Media Policy Summer Institute. For over 15 years PCMLP has organised this event, most recently in collaboration with the Centre for Global Communications Studies (CGCS) at the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg School for Communication.   It is a unique opportunity for young scholars and regulators from around the world to discuss important recent trends in technology, international politics and development and its influence on media policy. Further details about the programme can be found on the Institute's dedicated website.

  • Wed
    14
    Oct
    2015
    9.00-5.00Haldane Room, Wolfson College

    In association with the Foundation for Law, Justice and Society

    In enabling the creation and rapid spread of social media, the internet has created a new social arena in which vast numbers of people are engaged.

    In common with other social arenas, such as the family, the school, the corporation, cyber-society is rapidly developing its own social structure of understandings, normative conventions, and regulatory mechanisms.

    This workshop will identify the key concepts that make up the cognitive, normative, and regulatory structure of the cyber-society, and consider the implications of these amorpohous and unregulated online social spaces for personal identity, freedom of expression, privacy, and state sovereignty.

    Participants

    Denis Galligan, Professor of Socio-Legal Studies, University of Oxford
    Iginio Gagliardone, British Academy Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, University of Oxford
    Bernie Hogan, Research Fellow, Oxford Internet Institute
    Jacob Rowbottom, Associate Professor of Law, University of Oxford
    Nicole Stremlau, Research Fellow, Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy, Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford
    Damian Tambini, Senior Lecturer, Department of Media and Communications, LSE
    Ying Yu, Research Fellow, Wolfson College, University of Oxford, and Programme Coordinator, FLJS Consumer Rights in China Programme
  • Mon
    16
    Nov
    2015
    Oxford, UK

    Joint workshop with the Centre de Recherché en Information et Communication, ULB

    The workshop gathers researchers working on the interaction between media and politics in Africa. More specifically, it builds bridges between Francophone and Anglophone researchers exploring the role of the media in different cultural regions of the continent, as the media systems, journalists’ practices or the economy of the sector show some striking contrasts, from one place to the other. The colonial legacy still has a strong impact on, for instance, the language used by the newspapers, the organization of the broadcasting sector and the involvement of the state in shaping the internet and new media.

    The discussion will focus on key issues around elections and conflicts. Whenever possible contemporary papers and analyses will be mixed with more historical approaches. The workshop will seek to focus on historical trajectories and the political ideas and ideologies that have shaped the development of media. Countries to be discussed include Ethiopia, the DRC, Zambia, Kenya, South Africa and Burundi.

  • Mon
    23
    Nov
    2015
    Tue
    24
    Nov
    2015
    University of Oxford

    We are pleased to announce that the University of Oxford will be hosting the forthcoming conference on “Arcs in Internet Regulation: Assessing New Directions” on November 23rd and 24th in Oxford.  This is part of the annual Peking-Oxford-Stanford series in Internet Law and Policy. This conference builds on previous annual events and focuses on significant issues in Internet law and policy that will require attention in the coming years, such as digital human rights, smart cities, new technologies and courts, and Internet governance and development.

    The conference draws primarily on the strengths of the three universities involved, and their networks, bringing together a unique collection of scholars and students, government officials, corporate executives, and civil society representatives with the goal of informing research and strengthening the understanding of alternative viewpoints with a focus on the US, Europe and China, as well as global challenges

    This is an extraordinary opportunity to debate and discuss the future of the Internet. The Conference is hosted by the University of Oxford’s Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy in the Faculty of Law’s Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, with generous support from Tencent. Additional information can be found here.

  • Thu
    26
    Nov
    2015
    Sun
    29
    Nov
    2015
    New Delhi, India

    The South Asia Rounds of the Price Media Law Moot Court Programme are organised in collaboration with our partners at the National Law University, Delhi. Further information about the South Asia Rounds, and associated seminars and events, can be found here.

  • Fri
    04
    Dec
    2015
    Sun
    06
    Dec
    2015
    Belgrade, Serbia

    The South East Europe Rounds of the Price Media Law Moot Court Programme are organised in collaboration with our partners at the University of Belgrade. Further information about the South East Europe Rounds, and associated seminars and events, can be found here.

  • Mon
    21
    Dec
    2015
    Wed
    23
    Dec
    2015
    Beijing, China

    The Asia Pacific Rounds of the Price Media Law Moot Court Programme are organised in collaboration with our partners at the Renmin University, Beijing. Further information about the South Asia Rounds, and associated seminars and events, can be found here.