• Wed
    25
    Jan
    2012
    Wed
    29
    Feb
    2012
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    This seminar series explores the role the media play as political actors in developing countries and fragile states. It gathers scholars from a variety of disciplines to examine how old and new media are used to support different political agenda: from foreign countries trying to win the hearts and minds of a local population to local governments aiming at increasing their ability to communicate with, but also exercise control over, their citizens. Particular attention will be paid to understanding how flows of information can be mapped in contexts characterized by an increasing media density, resulting from the liberalization of the airwaves, the diffusion of mobile phones and new media, and the persistence of traditional modes of communication.

    The seminar series is part of a year-long programme of events organized by the Centre of Governance and Human Rights (CGHR) at the University of Cambridge, the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Politics (PCMLP), Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, at the University of Oxford and the Justice and Security Research Programme (JSRP) at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

    Week 2 - Wed 25 January THE USE OF ICTS FOR POLITICAL MOBILIZATION AND PARTICIPATION IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
    ROUND TABLE: Dr Sharath Srinivasan, Dr Florence Brisset-Foucault, University of Cambridge, Dr Iginio Gagliardone, University of Oxford

    Week 3 - Wed 1 February THE EPARTICIPATION ECOLOGY OF KENYA
    Dr Vincenzo Cavallo, Cultural Video Foundation, Nairobi

    Week 4 - Wed 8 February THE CONDITIONS OF STRATEGIC NARRATIVE EFFECTIVENESS: INFRASTRUCTURE, INTENTION, EXPERIENCE
    Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Royal Holloway, University of London

    Week 5 - Wed 15 February CHINA'S INTERNATIONAL OUTREACH: SOFT POWER AND THE SOFT USE OF POWER
    Professor Gary Rawnsley, University of Leeds

    Week 6 - Wed 22 February BROADCASTING THE STATE: TRIBE, CITIZENSHIP AND THE POLITICS OF RADIO DRAMA IN AFGHANISTAN
    Professor Marie Gillespie, Open University

    Week 7 - Wed 29 February AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE USE OF THE MEDIA FOR POLITICAL MOBILIZATION
    Dr John Postill, Sheffield Hallam University

    ~ All are welcome, please email iginio.gagliardone@csls.ox.ac.uk for further information ~

    **If you missed this series, we have made the videos available online in the MULTIMEDIA section of this website.

  • Wed
    01
    Feb
    2012
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    The post-election dispute that erupted in Kenya in 2007/2008 caused not only clashes followed by widespread violence and forced internal migrations but also the beginning of a new technological era for the Kenyan tech community and the Kenyan media activist scene. This talk will explore how a set of new analytical tools can be employed to study how new technologies can be used to gain power by different types of activists. Dr Vincenzo Cavallo will reflect in particular on the concept of Informational Multitude and on the model he developed during his research in Kenya, the eParticipation Ecologies, discussing possible applications for future research projects and political actions.

    Speaker: Dr Vincenzo Cavallo (Cultural Video Foundation, Nairobi) is a visual artist, academic and a media activist. Since 2003 he has been producing video documentaries and developed participation platforms for independent media companies, national and international broadcasters, cultural institutions, no profit organizations and social movements. In 2009 he developed www.urbanmirror.org, a participatory platform using the Ushahidi software to map public space and public art in Nairobi.

    The event is part of the seminar series “MEDIA AND GOVERNANCE IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: NETWORKS OF POWER AND STRATEGIC NARRATIVES” organized by the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP). For more information, please contact Iginio.gagliardone@csls.ox.ac.uk

    **If you missed the seminar, we have made the video of the event available online in the MULTIMEDIA section of this website.

  • Wed
    08
    Feb
    2012
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    A decade of attempts by the US and UK to “win hearts and minds” has thrown up a series of conceptual and practical difficulties for leaders seeking to wield strategic narratives, for analysts charged with demonstrating their effectiveness, and for scholars trying to explain how communication and international relations intersect. Strategic narratives are a means for political actors to construct a shared meaning of international politics to shape the behaviour of domestic and international actors. They are critical to explaining change in the international system. This paper examines three challenges: (i) Changing information infrastructures alter how shared meanings are constructed; (ii) Many narratives seem to escape the intentions of their original authors; and (iii) Target audiences may ‘buy in’ to a major power’s narrative but still not experience international politics as that major power hoped. Does this mean that measurable effects are forever disappearing over the horizon?

    Speaker: Ben O’Loughlin is Professor of International Relations and Co-Director of the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London. He co-edits the Sage journal Media, War & Conflict. His books include Radicalisation and Media: Terrorism and Connectivity in the New Media Ecology (2011), War and Media: The Emergence of Diffused War (2010) and Television and Terror: Conflicting Times and the Crisis of News Discourse (2007/09). His projects on media and security have been funded by the ESRC, CPNI and the Technology Strategy Board.

    **If you missed the seminar, we have made the video of the event available online in the MULTIMEDIA section of this website.

  • Wed
    15
    Feb
    2012
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    China has boarded the soft power bandwagon with an enthusiasm rarely witnessed elsewhere: Confucius Institutes, promotional videos in New York’s Times Square, CCTV 9, pandas arriving at Edinburgh Zoo. China’s soft power strategy explores new and innovative techniques of attracting global attention, while also embracing History and traditional culture as themes that can resonate with international audiences.

    However, how does this international outreach strategy sit with soft power theory which highlights the importance of projecting values, ideals and principles? Is the Chinese approach to soft power modelled on identifiably ‘western’ practices, or does it demonstrate distinct Chinese understandings of soft power? The research presented in this seminar is an attempt to begin the process of de-Westernising soft power and to understand the disjuncture between China’s aspirations and the external perceptions of its actions. The presentation will critique China’s current international outreach strategy and question the emphasis on cultural approaches to soft power. Finally it will suggest that soft power cannot be a panacea for problems in the hard power domain.

    Speaker: Gary Rawnsley is Professor of International Communications at the University of Leeds. He is the co-editor of The Routledge Handbook of Chinese Media (forthcoming), Global Chinese Cinema: The Culture and Politics of Hero (2010) and Political Communications in Greater China (2003). He is the author of many books and articles on international communications with particular interest in Taiwan. His present research is a study of Taiwan’s soft power and public diplomacy.

  • Tue
    21
    Feb
    2012
    Thu
    23
    Feb
    2012
    Doha, Qatar

    From February 21st-23rd, the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP) is organizing the Middle East Regional Rounds of the Price Media Law Moot Court Competition in Doha, Qatar together with Qatar University’s College of Law, the Al Jazeera Media Training and Development Centre and the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication. The Finals will be broadcast live on Aljazeera Mubasher, Aljazeera’s 24 hour news channel from 8.30am AST (+3GMT): http://mubasher.aljazeera.net/

    After the Finals on February 23rd, a seminar will be held on Media Policy After the Arab Spring that will bring together leading academics and lawyers from the region for an intriguing discussion about the politics and challenges of media reform in the context of complex transitions.  Participants will include, among others, Judge Andras Sajo of the European Court of Human Rights and Professor at Central European University, Osama Abu-Deways who is Head of Al Jazeera’s Legal Affairs Department, and Professor Hussein Amin of the American University in Cairo.

    This event is open to all and will be held at the Al Jazeera Media Development and Training Centre in Doha.  For more information or to register, please contact Deeksha Sharma: deeksha.sharma@exeter.ox.ac.uk

  • Wed
    22
    Feb
    2012
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    How does the format of ‘The Archers’, BBC Radio 4’s longest running radio soap opera, travel and translate across linguistic and cultural boundaries and why? Why has the Afghan Archers been so popular over nearly two decades? Can such radio soap operas, designed to promote development, change the social worlds or behaviour of their audiences? How are the narratives understood and shaped by Afghan radio audiences? What are the challenges facing producers and dramatists who are tasked with creating strategic development narratives as well as entertaining dramas?

    This seminar will address questions that lie at the heart of a transformation in broadcasting that has accelerated over recent decades, namely, the blending of entertainment with education (edu-tainment) in pursuit, ostensibly, of specific development outcomes such as improved nutrition, conflict reduction or greater gender equity. The BBC World Service Trust, the international charity of the BBC World Service, has been at the forefront of these developments over the last two decades. However, their work in the field of drama for development has received little sustained academic scrutiny or critical appraisal from scholars or practitioners.

    This presentation is based on a longitudinal ethnographic research by and with Andrew Skuse on New Home, New Life – a radio soap produced by the BBC and the Afghan Education Project. It presents a conjunctural analysis of representations of the state, tribe and citizenship in the radio serial in three distinctly different political moments in recent Afghan political history: Mujahideen rule (1989.–1996), the Taliban era (1997.–2001) and the post-Taliban democratic period of US/NATO influence (2002-2010). The seminar will explore how not just development goals travel and translate via the Afghan Archers. Modern, neo-liberal state practices and institutional arrangements have become part of the textual fabric of New Home New Life and both traditional tribal and non-tribal rural audiences in Afghanistan interpret these stories in their everyday lives, often in unpredictable ways. Edu-tainment soaps can be seen to function as a form of ‘soft power’ and a conveyor of western liberal values but they do not always have the effects intended by donors, development workers and dramatists.

    Speaker: Marie Gillespie is Professor of Sociology at The Open University and Co-Director of the Centre for Research on Socio-Cultural Change. Andrew Skuse is Professor of Anthropology at Adelaide University. Andrew undertook primary research on New Home New Life. He worked with Marie from 2006-11 on collaborative research with BBC World Service Trust and they co-edited a volume, with Gerry Power, entitled Dramas for Development:: Cultural Translation and Social Change published by Sage India. For more details of project see: http://www8.open.ac.uk/researchprojects/diasporas/

  • Thu
    23
    Feb
    2012
    Doha, Qatar

    Organized by the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP), Qatar University's College of Law, the Aljazeera Media Training and Development Centre and  the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania        

    This dialogue brings together a group of top scholars, lawyers and regulators from the region and international community for an intriguing discussion about the politics and challenges of media reform in the context of complex transitions.  What types of media systems are new governments trying to create? What comparative lessons can be drawn and how should national policymakers think about and negotiate international and regional norms? International broadcasters such as Aljazeera had an instrumental role in providing critical information during revolutions in the region. How are these international broadcasters reflecting, amplifying or even encouraging demands for a particular direction of media reform?
     
    Welcoming and Opening Remarks

    Keynote Address:
    Professor Andras Sajo
    “Comparative Perspectives on the Protection of Journalist Sources”

    Panel One: Challenges and Opportunities in Media Policymaking and the Arab Spring
    This session explores how national and regional norms related to media freedom and access to information emerged in the Middle East and how they relate to international standards. It brings together data and experiences from various Arab countries to discuss how these norms are established and how they are enforced.

    Professor Hussein Amin
    “The Future of the Egyptian Broadcast Industry and the Need for a Regulator”

    William Youmans
    “Patterns in Violations of Expression and Journalism: Before and After the 2011 Arab Uprisings”

    Chair: Osama Abu-Dehays, Chief Legal Officer, AlJazeera Network

    Panel Two: Comparative Perspectives on Media Regulation and Standards
    Examines how governments seek to regulate producers and diffusers of information in the age of new media with a particular focus in the context of the Arab Spring.

    Professor Khawar Qureshi QC
    "The Challenges for Free Media in the Era of 24 hour real-time Transmission in the aftermath of the Arab Spring"

    Justice Barbara Dohmann
    "What are the Media for? Challenges for Regulation"

    Chair: Christopher Campbell-Holt, Acting Registrar, Qatar International Court and Dispute Resolution Centre

  • Fri
    24
    Feb
    2012
    Seminar Room B, Manor Road Building

    This seminar will bring together two of China’s leading academics to discuss contemporary challenges in media policy making.

    ZHUGE Weidong: The Reform Process and Policies in Chinese Media Industries
    China’s media sector has been experiencing tremendous growth in recent years. It has been reformed to apply company management to the originally non-profit media organizations. The process of such a reform can be divided into three phases, namely, the initial marketization, the establishment of media groups and systemic reform. This presentation will give a general introduction to the background, objectives, timetable as well as the problems emerging along the way of China’s media system reform.

    GONG Wenxiang: Media and the Beijing Olympics: Changes in the Age of New Media
    The coverage of the 2008 Beijing Olympics as typical “Media Events” was intended to present the positive image of China to the world. However, at the same time there was an explosion of new media, namely the internet, blogs, cell-phones, etc. The relationship between the traditional media events and the new media events can be cooperation, penetration, or even direct confrontation. In the era of New Media it is not easy for the official media to monopolize all the resources and channels of expression any more. The netizens found their own way of expression, their opinion leaders, and even their own agenda. It is a  new power for participation, and scholars view this as the dawn of an “E-Democracy” in China.

    Zhuge Weidong  and Gong Wenxiang are currently visiting academics at the Programme of Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP). Professor Zhuge is at the Department of Journalism and Communication at the Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences. His research interests include media policy, media management, and comparative media system studies. Professor Wenxiang is Director of the Institute of Communication and Culture at Beijing University. He works on comparative culture and communication studies, persuasion in communication, Chinese cultural aspects of communication and access to information.

    Wine and nibbles will be served afterwards.

  • Wed
    29
    Feb
    2012
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    A great deal has been written about the role of new media in recent episodes of social unrest in the Middle East, Europe, North America and other regions. However, missing from most discussions is a careful consideration of the processual dimensions of these struggles. Instead we are often given synoptic accounts that fail to take into account the unique constellations of media actors, technologies and arenas that will obtain at different stages of a conflict. In this paper I find inspiration in the Manchester School of Anthropology’s emphasis on the ‘processual form’ of a political conflict (Postill 2011). Drawing from a year’s anthropological fieldwork in Barcelona (Spain), I reconstruct the shifting mediascape of Spain’s 15-M or indignados movement, from its roots in an online mobilisation against an anti-digital piracy bill through its square occupation phase to more recent events, including its seminal influence on the global Occupy movement. I argue that markedly distinct mediascapes did indeed shape - and were in turn shaped - by a heterogeneous assortment of political actors at different phases of the conflict, including a strange webfellowship of (micro)bloggers, hackers, technopreneurs, lawyers and students during the preparatory stages of the 15 May marches. It is within such transient configurations, I propose, that we can best assess the significance of different media technologies to the birth, growth and eventual demise of a protest movement. I end by briefly considering the potential applicability of this processual approach to other social unrest case studies.

    Speaker: John Postill is an anthropologist who specialises in media and internet studies. He has a PhD in anthropology from University College London (UCL) and is senior lecturer in media at Sheffield Hallam University. He has conducted fieldwork in Malaysia and Spain and is the author of Media and Nation Building (2006) and Localizing the Internet (2011) and the co-editor of Theorising Media and Practice (2010). Currently he is writing a book about social media and protest, with special reference to Spain's indignados movement.

    The event is part of the seminar series “MEDIA AND GOVERNANCE IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: NETWORKS OF POWER AND STRATEGIC NARRATIVES”. For more information, contact Iginio.gagliardone@csls.ox.ac.uk

  • Tue
    06
    Mar
    2012
    African Studies Centre

    Speaker: Dr Iginio Gagliardone

    After witnessing the critical role new Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) played in supporting political change in Northern Africa at the beginning of 2011, expectations have grown that in Sub-Saharan Africa authoritarian or ‘semi-authoritarian’ regimes may also be challenged by emerging uses of ICTs. However, there have been little signs that long-standing leaders in countries like Zimbabwe, Ethiopia, or Uganda may be ousted from power by a popular uprising supported by and coordinated through the use of new technologies. What are the reasons for this apparent absence of impact? How much of the lack of technologically mediated mobilizations for greater rights and political freedoms depends simply on the limited diffusion of ICTs such as the Internet? How much depends instead on local specific political patterns and dynamics? And, in the absence of revolutionary outcomes, are ICTs affecting and possibly transforming the nature of political mobilization and participation in more subtle ways? By analysing the case of Ethiopia and comparing the mobilization that followed the controversial and contested elections of 2005 with the events that led to regime changes in Tunisia and Ethiopia in 2011, this paper seeks answers to these questions and proposes an approach that captures the broader relationship between media and politics.

  • Wed
    21
    Mar
    2012
    Sat
    24
    Mar
    2012
    Oxford, UK

    From March 21st-24th, PCMLP will be organizing the the international oral rounds of the Price Media Law Moot Court Competition.

    The International Rounds in Oxford are the cornerstone of the Price Media Law Moot Court Programme and are now in their fifth year. The competition expands and stimulates an interest in Media Law and Policy among students, who will develop expertise in arguing a case before an international bench of judges from different legal systems and backgrounds.

    The International Rounds of the Price Moot Court Competition are known for their wide range of students and judges attending the competition from all over the world including teams from China, Ukraine, Nigeria, Kenya, India, Singapore, Jordan, Pakistan, Georgia, and Korea. In some cases, the students, coaches and judges deal with issues that are rarely debated or discussed in their own countries.

    The competition consistently attracts some of the most prominent figures in the field of media law and over 65 individuals will be coming to serve as judges this year.

    Participants in the International rounds held in Oxford operate in a world where a Universal Court of Human Rights has been established to ensure the citizens of the United Nations are enjoying the rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Moreover a Chamber of the Universal Court of Human Rights has been established in order to deal with issues specifically addressing cases concerning Freedom of Expression as set out in Article 19 of the UDHR and when freedom of expression collides with other fundamental rights in the Declaration. The Chamber is known as the “Universal Freedom of Expression Court”. Participants in the regional moot courts, or qualifying rounds, are encouraged to draw on domestic law when formulating their arguments.

    The Finals will be held from 12-2pm at Rhodes House and all are welcome to attend.  For further information, please see the Price Moot Court website.

  • Tue
    01
    May
    2012
    Wed
    02
    May
    2012
    Washington, DC, USA

    Iginio Gagliardone is presenting his ongoing research on ICTs and political mobilization at the conference “The New African Democracy: Information Technology and Political Participation”, organized by the African Studies Program at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

    The meeting brings together experts and policymakers to discuss challenges and opportunities for African politics in the digital age.

    The conference addresses two critical questions
    (i) How has ICT advanced democratic participation, government accountability, and state-society relations in Africa?
    (ii) How can policy better support connectivity and the use of ICT for democratic political participation and government accountability and transparency in the region?

    You can read more about the conference here: http://www.sais-jhu.edu/academics/regional-studies/africa/events/techconference.htm

    The conference is broadcast live at: http://www.sais-jhu.edu/pressroom/live.html

  • Sat
    26
    May
    2012
    Xianyang, China

    In the context of the EU project to support media law and regulation reform in China in which PCMLP participates, a discussion forum will be organized in Xianyang (Shaanxi Province, China) on 26 May, organized with Peking University's Centre for Reform Theory and Practice and the Great Britain China Centre. This workshop is aimed to provide input to professionals and policymakers concerning the role of media organizations and sector associations in media regulation, with a particular emphasis on self-regulation. As part of this forum, PCMLP researcher Rogier Creemers will provide background on principles of media self-regulation in Europe, and two other experts from the PCMLP network will present topics related to particular phenomena of self-regulation in practice.

  • Wed
    13
    Jun
    2012
    St Antony's College

    Panel 1: 14.00 – 15.45
    Chair: Dr. Nic Cheeseman, African Studies Centre, University of Oxford

    1. Changing discourses on democracy
    Professor Kjetil Tronvoll, International Law and Policy Institute, Oslo

    2. The Ethiopian politics machine: a view from below
    Marco di Nunzio, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Oxford
     
    3. The ‘democratic developmental state’: a product of 2005?
    Dr. Lovise Aalen, Chr. Michelsen Institute, Bergen

    4. EPRDF’s Ethiopia: changes and continuities
    Professor Christopher Clapham, Centre for African Studies, University of Cambridge

    15.45 – 16.00 Coffee Break

    Panel 2: 16.00 – 17.30
    Chair: Jason Mosley, Africa Programme, Chatham House

    1. Media and politics after 2005
    Dr. Nicole Stremlau, Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP), University of Oxford

    2. A Miscarriage of the paradigm shift: churches and the Ethiopian ‘Election 2005’
    Merid Desta, Oxford Centre for Mission Studies, University of Oxford

    3. New media: building or challenging the state?
    Dr. Iginio Gagliardone, Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP), University of Oxford

  • Fri
    15
    Jun
    2012
    Sat
    16
    Jun
    2012
    Seminar Room A, Manor Road Building

    China’s media landscape has undergone tremendous changes over the last few years. Technological innovation and the explosion of Internet use have changed the landscape for the dissemination of entertainment and information. Provincial television channels have boomed. Privatization and foreign investment and influence have become important questions for consideration. The cultural industries have become a priority area for further economic development. At the international level, media trade is one of the most prominent issues between China and the United States. Electronic media have also become a channel for bottom-up political activity: increasingly microblogs are used to bring specific incidents into the public sphere, or for satirical expressions. However, so far, questions of how these matters are governed have not yet been studied in depth. This conference aims to identify and discuss relevant questions of emerging issues in Chinese media law and policy.

    *Friday 15 June*

    09.15: Registration

    09.30 Welcome and Participant Introductions

    09.45 Workshop Overview (Dr Rogier Creemers, PCMLP)

    10.00-11.30: The Structure of Chinese Media Governance

    These two sessions explore how the Chinese media are organized. Topics to be addressed include the development of content regulation in China, the structure of the media control regime and the theoretical background of media governance.

    The Development of the Media Industry and the Reform On Content Regulation: The Case of China (Professor Li Danlin, Communication University of China)

    An Historical Overview of Chinese Departments and Ministries Engaged in Chinese Internet Management (Mr Gianluigi Negro, USI Lugano)

    For Whom Do You Speak? Looking at Chinese Media Regulation in a Luhmanian Way (Mr Ge Xing, University of Tokyo)

    Chair: Dr Damian Tambini (London School of Economics)

    11.30-11.45 Coffee break

    11.45-13.00 The Structure of Chinese Media Governance, part II

    Chinese Media Regulation and Entrepreneurship: The View From Social Media (Mr Alex Mou, Zuosa.com)

    Chinese Media Governance in a Comparative Perspective (Professor Monroe Price, University of Pennsylvania)

    Chair: Dr Anna Boermel (King’s College London)

    13.00-14.00: Lunch

    14.00-15.30: Defamation

    The expansion of China’s online population has fundamentally changed the public sphere. As a consequence, the number of disputes between private parties concerning expressions on social media has risen sharply. This session provides insight into different aspects of defamation cases, and aims to theorize the emerging legal doctrines in this field.

    Free Speech and Defamation on the Chinese Internet:
    A Case Study of the Human Flesh Search Engine (Mr Shen Weiwei, University of Pennsylvania)

    The Current Situation, Problems and Countermeasures of Defamation Law in China (Dr Zheng Wenming, Beijing Capital University of Economics and Business)

    Exploring the Particularities and Challenges of Media Tort in China: An Empirical Study on 800 Legal Cases (Mr Zhu Li, Wentian Law Firm, Beijing)

    Chair: Dr Perry Keller (King’s College London)

    15.30-15.45: Coffee Break

    15.45- 17.15: Press Regulation

    The traditional press remains an important channel for public communication. Traditionally, it was considered to be the mouthpiece of the Party, but as China’s society and political structure has grown more complex, fragmentation has rendered this characterization obsolete. Nonetheless, the Party-State aims to adapt its control over journalism to better suit changed circumstances. This session explores the measures that are being taken, for which purposes and what their impact is.

    Regulating Reporters: A Three-Tiered Approach (Professor Doreen Weisenhaus, University of Hong Kong, via Skype)

    The Media's Watchdog Role in China: the State's Promotion and Journalists' Interpretation (Ms Maria Repnikova, University of Oxford)

    Logic and Dynamics of Gradual Reform on China's Press Regulation: A Reflection on Enterprise Transformation and Delisting Mechanism (Professor Han Xiaoning, Renmin University of China)

    Chair: Mr Richard Danbury (University of Oxford)

    17.30-18.30: Drinks Reception (PCMLP)

    *Saturday 16 June*

    09.30-11.00: Telecommunications and Economic Regulation

    Following technological development, media require an increasingly complex technological support structure. Questions of network access, telecommunications and network integration are crucial as a framework for the content industries to develop. This session addresses some of these questions, in particular in relation to industrial policy, innovation and their effect on media markets.

    The Chinese Interpretation of Industrial Policy in Telecommunications and Media Markets (Dr Thomas Hart, Information Society Strategy and Policy, Beijing, via Skype)

    The Dragon Awakes: China's Telecoms, Internet, New Media, and Next Generation Networks (Professor Rohan Kariyawasam and Ms. Chen Zhang, University of Cardiff)

    Getting it Both Ways: Media Regulation in China in the Wake of Communications Convergence (Dr Zhongdong Niu, Edinburgh Napier University)

    Chair: Dr Nicole Stremlau (PCMLP)

    11.00-11.15: Coffee Break

    11.15-12.45: The Market and the Media

    Chinese media have become increasingly marketized, as they have emerged as an important locus of economic activity, as well as fulfilling a political role. However, commercial interests often clash with political and social objectives. This session looks at the regulation of advertising as an example of this, as well as the burgeoning animation sector. Furthermore, it explores the links between copyright and media regulation.

    How do the Chinese Copyright Law and Regulations Affect the Business Activities of the Media Industry? (Mr Wan Yong, Shanghai Jiaotong University)

    Blindness and Myopia Caused by Self-Interest: Government Failure in Chinese Advertising Regulation (Ms Li Mingwei, Shenzhen University)

    The Interplay Between Regulation and the Market in China’s Animation Industry (Dr Chwen Chwen Chen, Vincenzo De Masi, USI Lugano)

    Chair: Dr Rogier Creemers (PCMLP)

    12.45-13.15: Concluding Remarks

    13.15-14.15: Lunch

    Participation in this conference is free of charge, but space is limited so participants are kindly requested to register with Ms. Louise Scott (louise.scott@csls.ox.ac.uk). A sandwich lunch will be provided on both days.

  • Mon
    18
    Jun
    2012
    Fri
    29
    Jun
    2012
    Oxford, UK

    The Programme for Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford and the Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania are pleased to host the 14th annual Annenberg-Oxford Media Policy Summer Institute, to be held from Monday, June 18 to Friday, June 29, 2012 at the University of Oxford.

    The annual summer institute brings together young scholars and regulators to discuss important recent trends in technology, international politics and development and its influence on media policy. Participants come from around the world; countries represented at previous summer institute include Thailand, Kenya, China, Brazil, Egypt, Nigeria, Jordan, Italy and Bosnia, among others.

    This year the summer institute seeks, as part of the cohort, researchers and academics (PhD candidates and early career academics, for example), who will come with a research project related to the general subject of the seminar. Research generally related to the work of the Center for Global Communication Studies and the Programme for Comparative Media Law and Policy is especially welcome, and some participants will be asked to present their research.

    The seminars this year will focus on several key areas, including media governance in India and China and strategic communication in conflict and post-conflict and transitional environments, particularly in the Middle East and Africa. At the same time, the successful curriculum that has been the foundation of the program over the years will continue, with sessions covering global media policy issues such as media and economic/social development, freedom of information, internet regulation and convergence. Part of the course will be devoted to new developments in comparative approaches to regulation, looking at Ofcom in the UK and other agencies, including examples from the Middle East, Africa and Asia.

    The seminar brings together a wide range of participants from around the globe and provides them with an environment in which significant policy issues are seriously discussed. The richness of the experience comes from exposure to a variety of speakers and from the discussions among participants themselves.

  • Mon
    29
    Oct
    2012
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    Dr Rogier Creemers, PCMLP Project Officer, will speak about his current research on media law in China.

  • Fri
    09
    Nov
    2012
    St Antony's College

    In the past few years Africa has attracted unprecedented interest from international media players. In January 2012 China Central Television (CCTV) launched its new platform, CCTV Africa, providing information on Africa to Chinese, African and global audiences. Al Jazeera, as a relatively new player on the continent, has become increasingly popular and is exploring the possibility to launch of a new channel in Kiswahili, while actors which have broadcasted to Africa for a long time, such as the BBC, are developing a new strategy for the continent. This conference explores these transformations together with the very actors that are transforming old and new media on the African continent.

    Registration and Welcome:  Iginio Gagliardone,  University of Oxford
     
    Panel 1: 9.00-11.00 The New Face of International Broadcasting in Africa

    Song Jianing, Bureau Chief, CCTV Africa
    Mohamed Adow, Director, Al-Jazeera Kiswahili
    Mary Harper, Africa Editor, BBC
    Nicole Stremlau, University of Oxford
(Chair)

    Panel 2: 11.30-13.00 Reflecting on the Shift: Implications for Africa and Beyond

    Martyn Davies, CEO Frontier Advisory Africa
    Yushan Wu, South African Institute of International Affairs
    Winston Mano, University of Westminster
    Chris Alden, London School of Economics (Chair)

    Lunch in Hall: 13.00-14.00

    Panel 3: 14.00-16.00 New Media and New Technologies

    Wang Chaowen, General Director, Xinhua Africa Bureau
    Yawei Liu, Director, China Programme, The Carter Center
    Timothy Garton Ash, University of Oxford
    Martin Plaut, BBC (Chair)

    Early bird registration is £20 (£15 students) before 4 November. £30 thereafter. It includes lunch in hall. Register at http://oucan.politics.ox.ac.uk. Please contact oucan@politics.ox.ac.uk with any queries.

  • Mon
    19
    Nov
    2012
    Seminar Room D, Manor Road Building

    Dr Iginio Gagliardone, British Academy Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, will speak about his current research on the growing role of China in Africa's media.

  • Fri
    23
    Nov
    2012
    Mon
    26
    Nov
    2012
    Delhi, India

    The Price Media Law Moot Court - South Asia Regional Rounds will be held in collaboration with the Centre for Media Governance, NLU Delhi in Delhi, India from 23-26 November 2012. As part of the expansion of the Price Moot Court Programme in South Asia, this year's competition will see teams from the region traveling to Delhi for the South Asia Round. Victory for NALSAR University of Law, Hyderbad in the International Round of the Competition in March 2012 was a testament to the quality of mooting in India and we are sure that the competition for places in the International Rounds will intensify this year. The extremely high quality of judging has become a feature of the South Asia Regional Rounds and this year's competition will see a fantastic line-up of judges as well. For more information please see: http://pricemootcourt.socleg.ox.ac.uk/competitions/india/2012-13.

  • Wed
    28
    Nov
    2012
    Seminar Room B, Manor Road Building

    After the 18th Party Congress, many questions remain as to the path that China will take in the next five years, and how the new leadership will weigh on policy. One of the key bellwether areas to gauge reform will be media and the Internet. The pressure for China to open up the public space is growing, and open communication is increasingly necessary to further enhance economic performance. However, this will conflict with the instinctive climate of opacity fostered by the CCP. We will discuss the potential evolution of media policy, as well as current debates and trends with Professor Li Danlin (Communications University of China) and Ge Chen (University of Göttingen).

  • Fri
    14
    Dec
    2012
    Sun
    16
    Dec
    2012
    Belgrade, Serbia

    The Price Media Law Moot Court - South East Europe Regional Rounds will be held in Belgrade in collaboration with the University of Belgrade, Faculty of Law from 14-16 December 2012. A seminar on current issues in media policy in the region will be held along side the moot. For further information please visit: http://pricemootcourt.socleg.ox.ac.uk/competitions/see/2012-13